Gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartoma

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/239019
Title:
Gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartoma
Authors:
O'Connor, G; Chaila, E; Mullins, G; Delanty, N
Citation:
Epilepsia (2011) 52 SUPPL. 6 (35). : August 2011
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Epilepsia
Issue Date:
Aug-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/239019
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03207.x/abstract
Abstract:
Purpose: Gelastic epilepsy is a well recognized epilepsy syndrome, and is associated in almost all cases with the presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma. However, the epileptologist should be alert to alternative causes for such presentations. We present two cases from our service of gelastic seizures in the absence of hypothalamic hamartoma. Method: We reviewed the clinical features in both cases. Both patients were male and right-handed. The duration of epilepsy was similar in both cases, with onset in late adolescence. In both cases, epilepsy was refractory to treatment with antiepileptic medications. Clinical examination was unremarkable in both men. Both patients were investigated with video EEG monitoring and imaging to localize a seizure focus. Results: Video EEG monitoring in both cases suggested a right frontal focus for seizure onset. MRI in one patient revealed a right frontal mass lesion, and in the other, a right frontal cortical dysplasia. There was no evidence of a hypothalamic lesion in either case. After discussion, both cases were felt to be suitable for neurosurgical intervention. Conclusion: Gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma is rare, but some cases reported have had a right frontal focus for seizure onset. Causes reported in such cases have included tumors and cortical dysplasia. Many of the cases reported have had a good response to surgical intervention. In gelastic epilepsy, the clinician should be aware of causes other than hypothalamic hamartomata. Investigations should be directed towards confirming a seizure focus with a view to offering surgical intervention.
Item Type:
Conference Poster
Language:
en
Keywords:
EPILEPSY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChaila, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorMullins, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDelanty, Nen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T15:17:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T15:17:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-08-
dc.identifier.citationEpilepsia (2011) 52 SUPPL. 6 (35). : August 2011en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/239019-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Gelastic epilepsy is a well recognized epilepsy syndrome, and is associated in almost all cases with the presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma. However, the epileptologist should be alert to alternative causes for such presentations. We present two cases from our service of gelastic seizures in the absence of hypothalamic hamartoma. Method: We reviewed the clinical features in both cases. Both patients were male and right-handed. The duration of epilepsy was similar in both cases, with onset in late adolescence. In both cases, epilepsy was refractory to treatment with antiepileptic medications. Clinical examination was unremarkable in both men. Both patients were investigated with video EEG monitoring and imaging to localize a seizure focus. Results: Video EEG monitoring in both cases suggested a right frontal focus for seizure onset. MRI in one patient revealed a right frontal mass lesion, and in the other, a right frontal cortical dysplasia. There was no evidence of a hypothalamic lesion in either case. After discussion, both cases were felt to be suitable for neurosurgical intervention. Conclusion: Gelastic epilepsy without hypothalamic hamartoma is rare, but some cases reported have had a right frontal focus for seizure onset. Causes reported in such cases have included tumors and cortical dysplasia. Many of the cases reported have had a good response to surgical intervention. In gelastic epilepsy, the clinician should be aware of causes other than hypothalamic hamartomata. Investigations should be directed towards confirming a seizure focus with a view to offering surgical intervention.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03207.x/abstracten_GB
dc.subjectEPILEPSYen_GB
dc.titleGelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartomaen_GB
dc.typeConference Posteren
dc.identifier.journalEpilepsiaen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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