Diagnostic yield of catheter cerebral angiography in a single institution

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238993
Title:
Diagnostic yield of catheter cerebral angiography in a single institution
Authors:
Bruton, K A; Zahreen, Z; Ti, J P; Thornton, J; Lynch, B; Saunders, D; Ganesan, V; King, M
Citation:
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology (2011) 53 SUPPL. 1 (31). : January 2011
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Issue Date:
Jan-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238993
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03866.x/pdf
Abstract:
Introduction: Catheter cerebral angiography (CA) is the criterion standard in cerebrovascular imaging of childhood arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). However, recent data on the prevalence and classification of cerebral arteriopathy is based on non-invasive vascular imaging modalities, most commonly magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Aim: To describe CA findings in a series of children with AIS attending a single institution between 1989 and 2010 and to compare the diagnosis assigned at the time with current arteriopathy definitions. Method: Review of case records and neuroimaging. Children with known predisposing conditions were excluded. Arteriopathies were defined according to the criteria of Sebire et al. (2004). Results: Thirty children with AIS (11 males, 19 females) had CA performed (ages 8mo to 15y, median 6y 10mo). Fifteen patients presented with left-sided symptoms, 13 right-sided symptoms, one quadraparesis and one cerebellar signs. Four patients had seizures at presentation. CT was performed in 25 out of 30, 13 were abnormal. MRI was performed in 23 out of 30, all abnormal. MRA was performed in 16 out of 30, nine were abnormal. CA was performed in 30 out of 30, 19 were abnormal. Comparison of MRA with CA studies led to revision of diagnosis in 2 out of 16 owing to detectable lesion on CA (dissection, transient cerebral arteriopathy (TCA)). Subsequent review of CA studies resulted in revision of diagnosis in six out of 30 cases (occlusion – normal, vasculitis – TCA, normal – TCA, occlusion – TCA, unilateral moyamoya – vasculitis, moyamoya – fibromuscular dysplasia). Conclusions: CA provided additional information to MRA in 12.5% of cases. There is significant interobserver variation in interpretation of CA. Reference: 1. Sebire et al. Current opinion in paediatrics. 2004; 16: 617–622.
Item Type:
Conference Presentation
Language:
en
Keywords:
STROKE; NEUROLOGY; CHILD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBruton, K Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZahreen, Zen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTi, J Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLynch, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorGanesan, Ven_GB
dc.contributor.authorKing, Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T15:06:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T15:06:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-01-
dc.identifier.citationDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology (2011) 53 SUPPL. 1 (31). : January 2011en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/238993-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Catheter cerebral angiography (CA) is the criterion standard in cerebrovascular imaging of childhood arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). However, recent data on the prevalence and classification of cerebral arteriopathy is based on non-invasive vascular imaging modalities, most commonly magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Aim: To describe CA findings in a series of children with AIS attending a single institution between 1989 and 2010 and to compare the diagnosis assigned at the time with current arteriopathy definitions. Method: Review of case records and neuroimaging. Children with known predisposing conditions were excluded. Arteriopathies were defined according to the criteria of Sebire et al. (2004). Results: Thirty children with AIS (11 males, 19 females) had CA performed (ages 8mo to 15y, median 6y 10mo). Fifteen patients presented with left-sided symptoms, 13 right-sided symptoms, one quadraparesis and one cerebellar signs. Four patients had seizures at presentation. CT was performed in 25 out of 30, 13 were abnormal. MRI was performed in 23 out of 30, all abnormal. MRA was performed in 16 out of 30, nine were abnormal. CA was performed in 30 out of 30, 19 were abnormal. Comparison of MRA with CA studies led to revision of diagnosis in 2 out of 16 owing to detectable lesion on CA (dissection, transient cerebral arteriopathy (TCA)). Subsequent review of CA studies resulted in revision of diagnosis in six out of 30 cases (occlusion – normal, vasculitis – TCA, normal – TCA, occlusion – TCA, unilateral moyamoya – vasculitis, moyamoya – fibromuscular dysplasia). Conclusions: CA provided additional information to MRA in 12.5% of cases. There is significant interobserver variation in interpretation of CA. Reference: 1. Sebire et al. Current opinion in paediatrics. 2004; 16: 617–622.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03866.x/pdfen_GB
dc.subjectSTROKEen_GB
dc.subjectNEUROLOGYen_GB
dc.subjectCHILDen_GB
dc.titleDiagnostic yield of catheter cerebral angiography in a single institutionen_GB
dc.typeConference Presentationen
dc.identifier.journalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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