The national carers’ strategy - recognised, supported, empowered

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238974
Title:
The national carers’ strategy - recognised, supported, empowered
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH)
Publisher:
Brunswick Press Ltd.
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238974
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
A key objective of Government policy for older people, children and adults with an illness or a disability is to support them to live in dignity and independence in their own homes and communities for as long as possible. Carers are vital to the achievement of this objective and are considered a backbone of care provision in Ireland. Every day in this country, tens of thousands (1) of family members, friends, partners, parents, children, or neighbours, provide care for someone who, through a variety of circumstances, needs it. These are Ireland’s carers and what they do not only makes a profound difference to the health, well-being and quality of life of those that they care for, but makes an important, often unacknowledged contribution to the economy. The context in which the Strategy has been developed This Strategy has been developed at a time of significant economic challenges and public financial constraints. The State already faces challenges in maintaining current levels of services from within existing resources. In addition, the significant demographic changes to the Irish population structure, which are expected to occur over the next number of years, will have major implications for publicly provided supports and services. Furthermore, the Programme for Government commits to key and fundamental reforms of both the structure and delivery model of our health system. In advance of the restructuring of this system, it is difficult at this point to develop longer-term commitments or proposals for the future. The Strategy, therefore, concentrates on Actions for the short to medium term, which can, to the greatest extent possible, be achieved on a cost neutral basis. That said, there is a wide range of existing Government commitments, which, in tandem with this Strategy, will improve the position of carers within our society. The National Carers’ Strategy does not sit in isolation but rather is an integral part of the Government’s broader social inclusion agenda. It sits alongside and complements the National Disability Strategy (2004), A Vision for Change (2006), the National Housing Strategy for People with a Disability (2011-2016) and the forthcoming Children and Young People’s Policy Framework (2012-2017). It is also envisaged that there will be a high degree of commonality between this Strategy and the vision, principles and goals that will be articulated in the National Positive Ageing Strategy and the National Dementia Strategy when they are published. It is also important for this Strategy to have regard to the range of supports and services that are already available for carers so that proposals emerging from this Strategy build on, rather than duplicate, existing arrangements. Some supports are specifically targeted at carers but carers can also benefit from the supports aimed at those for whom they are caring. In addition, voluntary and community groups provide a range of supports for carers, much of which is State funded.
Keywords:
GOVERNMENT, POLITICS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION; OLDER PEOPLE; CARER; HEALTH POLICY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T10:43:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T10:43:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/238974-
dc.descriptionA key objective of Government policy for older people, children and adults with an illness or a disability is to support them to live in dignity and independence in their own homes and communities for as long as possible. Carers are vital to the achievement of this objective and are considered a backbone of care provision in Ireland. Every day in this country, tens of thousands (1) of family members, friends, partners, parents, children, or neighbours, provide care for someone who, through a variety of circumstances, needs it. These are Ireland’s carers and what they do not only makes a profound difference to the health, well-being and quality of life of those that they care for, but makes an important, often unacknowledged contribution to the economy. The context in which the Strategy has been developed This Strategy has been developed at a time of significant economic challenges and public financial constraints. The State already faces challenges in maintaining current levels of services from within existing resources. In addition, the significant demographic changes to the Irish population structure, which are expected to occur over the next number of years, will have major implications for publicly provided supports and services. Furthermore, the Programme for Government commits to key and fundamental reforms of both the structure and delivery model of our health system. In advance of the restructuring of this system, it is difficult at this point to develop longer-term commitments or proposals for the future. The Strategy, therefore, concentrates on Actions for the short to medium term, which can, to the greatest extent possible, be achieved on a cost neutral basis. That said, there is a wide range of existing Government commitments, which, in tandem with this Strategy, will improve the position of carers within our society. The National Carers’ Strategy does not sit in isolation but rather is an integral part of the Government’s broader social inclusion agenda. It sits alongside and complements the National Disability Strategy (2004), A Vision for Change (2006), the National Housing Strategy for People with a Disability (2011-2016) and the forthcoming Children and Young People’s Policy Framework (2012-2017). It is also envisaged that there will be a high degree of commonality between this Strategy and the vision, principles and goals that will be articulated in the National Positive Ageing Strategy and the National Dementia Strategy when they are published. It is also important for this Strategy to have regard to the range of supports and services that are already available for carers so that proposals emerging from this Strategy build on, rather than duplicate, existing arrangements. Some supports are specifically targeted at carers but carers can also benefit from the supports aimed at those for whom they are caring. In addition, voluntary and community groups provide a range of supports for carers, much of which is State funded.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBrunswick Press Ltd.en_GB
dc.subjectGOVERNMENT, POLITICS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIONen_GB
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectCARERen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH POLICYen_GB
dc.titleThe national carers’ strategy - recognised, supported, empowereden_GB
dc.typeReporten
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.