Gestational diabetes mellitus results in a higher prevalence of small for gestational age babies

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238824
Title:
Gestational diabetes mellitus results in a higher prevalence of small for gestational age babies
Authors:
Avalos, G; Owens, LA; Dennedy, C; O'Sullivan, EP; O'Reilly, MW; Dunne, F
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway, Ireland.
Publisher:
European Association for the Study of Diabetes
Issue Date:
Sep-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238824
Additional Links:
http://www.easd2011.com
Abstract:
Background and aims: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is associated with increased foetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have shown that babies of diabetic mothers are more likely to be large for gestational age (LGA). This retrospective study aimed to assess whether the converse may also be true, that there may also a higher rate of small for gestational age (SGA) amongst babies of mothers with GDM. Materials and methods: This retrospective study offered universal screening for GDM to pregnant women in 5 hospitals between 2007-2009. During this time 5,500 women underwent testing for GDM using a 75g Oral Glucose Tolerance Test at 24-28 weeks gestation. GDM was defined by the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups guidelines (IADPSG). Results: The prevalence of GDM was 12.4%. 4.5% of babies were small for gestational age (SGA) at birth in live births. Babies of mothers with GDM were more likely to have SGA than babies of non-diabetic women, OR 1.5, p=0.03, 95% CI {1.02-2.24. Mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was lower in mothers of SGA babies than mothers of babies who were average (AGA) or large for gestational age (LGA), 26.3 compared to 27.1, p<0.0001. Smoking (OR 3.1, p=0.000)) pre-ecampsia (OR 3.99,p=0.000), gestational hypertension, low parity (OR 0.8.p= 0.005), non-Caucasion ethnicity were also predictive of SGA These SGA babies had a worse clinical outcome, including; higher caesarean section rate, higher requirement for neonatal intensive care , higher rates of hypoglycaemia and respiratory distress. 76% of diabetic women were treated with insulin. Insulin treatment did not affect rates of SGA when compared with dietary management. Conclusion: This study shows another important negative outcome associated with GDM. Further research is required to identify the causative factor(s).
Item Type:
Conference Poster
Language:
en
Keywords:
DIABETES; PREGNANCY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAvalos, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwens, LAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDennedy, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, EPen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, MWen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Fen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-15T14:33:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-15T14:33:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/238824-
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is associated with increased foetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have shown that babies of diabetic mothers are more likely to be large for gestational age (LGA). This retrospective study aimed to assess whether the converse may also be true, that there may also a higher rate of small for gestational age (SGA) amongst babies of mothers with GDM. Materials and methods: This retrospective study offered universal screening for GDM to pregnant women in 5 hospitals between 2007-2009. During this time 5,500 women underwent testing for GDM using a 75g Oral Glucose Tolerance Test at 24-28 weeks gestation. GDM was defined by the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups guidelines (IADPSG). Results: The prevalence of GDM was 12.4%. 4.5% of babies were small for gestational age (SGA) at birth in live births. Babies of mothers with GDM were more likely to have SGA than babies of non-diabetic women, OR 1.5, p=0.03, 95% CI {1.02-2.24. Mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was lower in mothers of SGA babies than mothers of babies who were average (AGA) or large for gestational age (LGA), 26.3 compared to 27.1, p<0.0001. Smoking (OR 3.1, p=0.000)) pre-ecampsia (OR 3.99,p=0.000), gestational hypertension, low parity (OR 0.8.p= 0.005), non-Caucasion ethnicity were also predictive of SGA These SGA babies had a worse clinical outcome, including; higher caesarean section rate, higher requirement for neonatal intensive care , higher rates of hypoglycaemia and respiratory distress. 76% of diabetic women were treated with insulin. Insulin treatment did not affect rates of SGA when compared with dietary management. Conclusion: This study shows another important negative outcome associated with GDM. Further research is required to identify the causative factor(s).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Association for the Study of Diabetesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.easd2011.comen_GB
dc.subjectDIABETESen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.titleGestational diabetes mellitus results in a higher prevalence of small for gestational age babiesen_GB
dc.typeConference Posteren
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway, Ireland.en_GB
dc.description.provinceConnachten
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