ATLANTIC-DIP: raised maternal body mass index (BMI) adversely affects maternal and foetal outcomes in glucose tolerant women classified using International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238789
Title:
ATLANTIC-DIP: raised maternal body mass index (BMI) adversely affects maternal and foetal outcomes in glucose tolerant women classified using International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria
Authors:
Dennedy, MC; Avalos, G; O'Reilly, MW; O'Sullivan, EP; Dunne, F
Affiliation:
Medicine, NUI, Galway, Galway, Ireland.
Publisher:
European Association for the Study of Diabetes
Issue Date:
15-Sep-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238789
Additional Links:
http://www.easd.org
Abstract:
Background and aims: Raised maternal body mass index (BMI), in association with hyperglycaemia is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Whether BMI has an independent effect on adverse pregnancy outcome is not clear. We aimed to investigate the effects of raised maternal BMI on pregnancy outcome in glucose tolerant women, classified using the IADPSG criteria. Materials and methods: Prospective observational study of pregnancy outcome in a cohort of women attending an antenatal clinic recruited to a universal screening programme for gestational diabetes. Maternal outcomes included glucose, delivery mode, pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), pre-eclampsia (PET), antepartum hemorrhage (APH) and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Fetal outcomes included birthweight, congenital malformation, fetal death, neonatal jaundice, hypoglycemia and respiratory distress. Analyses performed using stepwise logistic regression and decision trees. Analyses adjusted for maternal age, parity, cigarette smoking and ethnicity. Results: Increasing maternal BMI was associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes: higher cesarean section rates, pre-eclamptic toxemia, pregnancy induced hypertension, increased birth weight and congenital malformation. The association of normal range glucose with adverse pregnancy outcome was weak and did not interact with the effects of raised BMI. A BMI threshold of 28 kg/m2 was associated with a significant rise in adverse pregnancy outcome. Adverse obstetric outcome in association with raised BMI was greater in primiparous women. Conclusion: Raised maternal BMI, within the overweight range, is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. These adverse effects of BMI occur independently of maternal glucose.
Item Type:
Conference Presentation
Language:
en
Keywords:
PREGNANCY
Sponsors:
Health Research Board

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDennedy, MCen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAvalos, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, MWen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, EPen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Fen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-15T14:16:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-15T14:16:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-09-15-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/238789-
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims: Raised maternal body mass index (BMI), in association with hyperglycaemia is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Whether BMI has an independent effect on adverse pregnancy outcome is not clear. We aimed to investigate the effects of raised maternal BMI on pregnancy outcome in glucose tolerant women, classified using the IADPSG criteria. Materials and methods: Prospective observational study of pregnancy outcome in a cohort of women attending an antenatal clinic recruited to a universal screening programme for gestational diabetes. Maternal outcomes included glucose, delivery mode, pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), pre-eclampsia (PET), antepartum hemorrhage (APH) and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Fetal outcomes included birthweight, congenital malformation, fetal death, neonatal jaundice, hypoglycemia and respiratory distress. Analyses performed using stepwise logistic regression and decision trees. Analyses adjusted for maternal age, parity, cigarette smoking and ethnicity. Results: Increasing maternal BMI was associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes: higher cesarean section rates, pre-eclamptic toxemia, pregnancy induced hypertension, increased birth weight and congenital malformation. The association of normal range glucose with adverse pregnancy outcome was weak and did not interact with the effects of raised BMI. A BMI threshold of 28 kg/m2 was associated with a significant rise in adverse pregnancy outcome. Adverse obstetric outcome in association with raised BMI was greater in primiparous women. Conclusion: Raised maternal BMI, within the overweight range, is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. These adverse effects of BMI occur independently of maternal glucose.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipHealth Research Boarden_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Association for the Study of Diabetesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.easd.orgen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.titleATLANTIC-DIP: raised maternal body mass index (BMI) adversely affects maternal and foetal outcomes in glucose tolerant women classified using International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteriaen_GB
dc.typeConference Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentMedicine, NUI, Galway, Galway, Ireland.en_GB
dc.description.provinceConnachten
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