Atlantic DIP: Diabetes in Pregnancy: a comparative study of stress and wellbeing in women with established diabetes, gestational diabetes, and those without diabetes

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238788
Title:
Atlantic DIP: Diabetes in Pregnancy: a comparative study of stress and wellbeing in women with established diabetes, gestational diabetes, and those without diabetes
Authors:
Lydon, K; McGuire, B; Owens, LA; Sarma, K; Avalos, G; Carmody, L; O'Connor, C; Nestor, L; Dunne, F
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway, Ireland, 2School of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway, Ireland.
Publisher:
European Association for the Study of Diabetes
Issue Date:
15-Sep-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/238788
Additional Links:
http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/browse.aspx
Abstract:
Background and aims: Diabetes in pregnancy increases the risk of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The experience of diabetes during pregnancy may be a significant source of stress, both because of the impact of the illness and associated treatments on the expectant mother and because of concern about the impact on the unborn child. In order to examine stress associated with diabetes during pregnancy, we carried out a prospective study in women with pre-existing (Type 1 or Type 2) Diabetes (PDM), Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM), and non-diabetic pregnant controls (NDM). Materials and methods: The participants were 210 pregnant women - 25 with pre-existing diabetes (PDM), 77 with GDM and 108 healthy controls (NDM). All were attending antenatal services in six health care centres in Ireland. We measured stress and wellbeing with several standardised psychological questionnaires including The Pregnancy Experience Scale; The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale; the Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale; the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Diabetes; the Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale; the SF-8 and the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale. We hypothesized that diabetic women would report higher levels of stress than healthy controls and we also hypothesized that social support may confer a protective role. Results: We found a non-significant trend of increased stress and lower quality of life among diabetic women compared to non-diabetic controls. Women with PDM perceived their illness as having a higher impact on their lives than those with GDM (p<0.0001). However, women with pre-existing diabetes also reported significantly greater self-efficacy in relation to their diabetes management compared to their gestational diabetes counterparts (p<0.05). The results of the remaining questionnaires demonstrate a general trend towards higher distress in diabetic women compared to controls. The healthy controls reported higher perceived social support which may confer a protective role against psychological stress. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that pregnant diabetic women perceive themselves as having a lower quality of life and higher levels of stress in pregnancy, especially women with pre-existing diabetes. This may indicate a need for psychological support in these patients. However, further research is required.
Item Type:
Conference Presentation
Language:
en
Keywords:
PREGNANCY; DIABETES; PSYCHOLOGICAL DETERMINANT; STRESS
Local subject classification:
ATLANTIC DIP

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLydon, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwens, LAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSarma, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorAvalos, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarmody, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNestor, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Fen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-15T14:12:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-15T14:12:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-09-15-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/238788-
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims: Diabetes in pregnancy increases the risk of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The experience of diabetes during pregnancy may be a significant source of stress, both because of the impact of the illness and associated treatments on the expectant mother and because of concern about the impact on the unborn child. In order to examine stress associated with diabetes during pregnancy, we carried out a prospective study in women with pre-existing (Type 1 or Type 2) Diabetes (PDM), Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM), and non-diabetic pregnant controls (NDM). Materials and methods: The participants were 210 pregnant women - 25 with pre-existing diabetes (PDM), 77 with GDM and 108 healthy controls (NDM). All were attending antenatal services in six health care centres in Ireland. We measured stress and wellbeing with several standardised psychological questionnaires including The Pregnancy Experience Scale; The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale; the Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale; the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Diabetes; the Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale; the SF-8 and the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale. We hypothesized that diabetic women would report higher levels of stress than healthy controls and we also hypothesized that social support may confer a protective role. Results: We found a non-significant trend of increased stress and lower quality of life among diabetic women compared to non-diabetic controls. Women with PDM perceived their illness as having a higher impact on their lives than those with GDM (p<0.0001). However, women with pre-existing diabetes also reported significantly greater self-efficacy in relation to their diabetes management compared to their gestational diabetes counterparts (p<0.05). The results of the remaining questionnaires demonstrate a general trend towards higher distress in diabetic women compared to controls. The healthy controls reported higher perceived social support which may confer a protective role against psychological stress. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that pregnant diabetic women perceive themselves as having a lower quality of life and higher levels of stress in pregnancy, especially women with pre-existing diabetes. This may indicate a need for psychological support in these patients. However, further research is required.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Association for the Study of Diabetesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/browse.aspxen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.subjectDIABETESen_GB
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGICAL DETERMINANTen_GB
dc.subjectSTRESSen_GB
dc.subject.otherATLANTIC DIPen_GB
dc.titleAtlantic DIP: Diabetes in Pregnancy: a comparative study of stress and wellbeing in women with established diabetes, gestational diabetes, and those without diabetesen_GB
dc.typeConference Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway, Ireland, 2School of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Galway, Ireland.en_GB
dc.description.provinceConnachten
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