A history of haemovigilance South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital 2000 - Present

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/237572
Title:
A history of haemovigilance South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital 2000 - Present
Authors:
Roche, Catherine
Publisher:
South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/237572
Abstract:
The Haemovigilance speciality defines itself as nursing and subscribes to the overall purpose, functions and ethical standards of nursing. The clinical practice role may be divided into direct and indirect care. Direct care comprises the assessment, planning, delivery and evaluation of care to patients. Indirect care relates to activities that influence others in their provision of direct care. The Haemovigilance Officer as a clinical professional in the Irish healthcare environment is required to maintain professional competency and this is achieved through continuous ongoing education and training, attending in-service study days, conferences locally and nationally. While attending various conferences numerous posters have been presented which have showcased the hospital’s work. Evidence of continuous professional development is contained in Appendix 1. Mission Statement: In collaboration with nursing staff, medical staff and the Irish Blood Transfusion Service, the Haemovigilance Officer strives to deliver an effective, efficient, cost effective and quality transfusion service for the patients of the SIVUH through ongoing education, surveillance and clinical audit. (Reviewed August 2011). Haemovigilance is internationally recognised as essential to the development of safe clinical transfusion practice. As the time of writing this report, the hospital in the context of the Reconfiguration of Health services for the Cork and Kerry region, is in a transitional phase as the hospital moves from an acute general hospital to an elective and largely surgical hospital. Such changes in the nature and type of clinical service provision will naturally impact on the requirement for blood and blood products.
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Keywords:
BLOOD TRANSFUSION; NURSES; PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Local subject classification:
HAEMOVIGILANCE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Catherineen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-07T13:04:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-07T13:04:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/237572-
dc.description.abstractThe Haemovigilance speciality defines itself as nursing and subscribes to the overall purpose, functions and ethical standards of nursing. The clinical practice role may be divided into direct and indirect care. Direct care comprises the assessment, planning, delivery and evaluation of care to patients. Indirect care relates to activities that influence others in their provision of direct care. The Haemovigilance Officer as a clinical professional in the Irish healthcare environment is required to maintain professional competency and this is achieved through continuous ongoing education and training, attending in-service study days, conferences locally and nationally. While attending various conferences numerous posters have been presented which have showcased the hospital’s work. Evidence of continuous professional development is contained in Appendix 1. Mission Statement: In collaboration with nursing staff, medical staff and the Irish Blood Transfusion Service, the Haemovigilance Officer strives to deliver an effective, efficient, cost effective and quality transfusion service for the patients of the SIVUH through ongoing education, surveillance and clinical audit. (Reviewed August 2011). Haemovigilance is internationally recognised as essential to the development of safe clinical transfusion practice. As the time of writing this report, the hospital in the context of the Reconfiguration of Health services for the Cork and Kerry region, is in a transitional phase as the hospital moves from an acute general hospital to an elective and largely surgical hospital. Such changes in the nature and type of clinical service provision will naturally impact on the requirement for blood and blood products.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSouth Infirmary Victoria University Hospitalen_GB
dc.subjectBLOOD TRANSFUSIONen_GB
dc.subjectNURSESen_GB
dc.subjectPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENTen_GB
dc.subject.otherHAEMOVIGILANCEen_GB
dc.titleA history of haemovigilance South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital 2000 - Presenten_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.description.provinceMunsteren
All Items in Lenus,the Irish health repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.