Drug abusers in the Dublin Committal System: a survey: a joint research project

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/237473
Title:
Drug abusers in the Dublin Committal System: a survey: a joint research project
Authors:
O'Mahony, Paul; Gilmore, Thomas; Department of Justice. Probation and Welfare Psychological Services
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Issue Date:
Oct-1982
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/237473
Item Type:
Other
Language:
en
Description:
Thirty-four offenders were interviewed from the three institutions, 22 from Mountjoy Male Prison, nine from St. Patrick's Institution and three from Mountjoy Female Prison. The age range of the group was 17 to 32 with an average age of 22.5 years. Seven of the total group of 34 were married (two separated) but 12 of the 34 subjects had children. Eighteen of the 34 were still residing in the parental home. In five cases the parents of the offender had separated and in five cases both parents had died. In a further two cases the mother only was dead and in a further three cases the father only was dead. In short, in 15 out of 34 cases the family of origin was not intact. Nineteen of the 34 subjects were from families with at least eight children and only five were from families with less than four children. Twenty-three of the total group had left school by 15 years of age and only one of the 34 had experienced schooling after the age of 16. Seventeen had never retained a job for more than one year and six of the remaining seventeen, who had experience of longer term employment, were in casual, part-time jobs. Of the 34 offenders four were serving sentences for crimes under the Misuse of Drugs Act. Seven were serving their first term in custody but altogether the 34 offenders had been sentenced to 102 separate terms of custody, only 11 of which were directly related to drug offences. The main drug of abuse for 28 of the total group was a narcotic analgesic and in 23 cases heroin was the most frequently used narcotic. Of the remaining six, one individual was addicted to barbiturates and five regularly used L.S.D. All the non-narcotic users were in the older Mountjoy Male Prison group. Twenty-three of the total had received methadone detoxification treatment after their arrival in prison. Eleven reported having suffered hepatitis and a further four spoke of jaundice but did not specify hepatitis. Seventeen of the 34 had at some point overdosed while eight reported that they had made at least one serious attempt at suicide. Of the group 11 had at least one brother or sister seriously abusing drugs and in five of these cases the sibling started drug abuse after the subject. 49 Eleven of the group claimed to have no experience of treatment whatsoever. However, 17 had undergone methadone detoxification outside the prison and ten of these on more than one occasion. Ten of the group, including two females , had experience of the Coolmine Therapeutic Community but five of the ten remained there for less than a week. Both females remained at Coolmine for seven months but the longest period spent there by a male was 2! months. In no case, therefore, was the complete programme of treatment experienced. Of the twenty seven offenders who had served a previous term of custody all returned to using drugs, though drug-free while in prison, and 19 were abusing drugs within one week of release. Twenty-three of the 34 subjects answered yes that they did intend to give up using drugs, however only six of these people really thought that they would never use drugs again. The other 11 subjects were virtually certain they would use drugs again. Finally, to give some indication of trends in the number of drug abusers b~ing committed to prison a comparison was made of the numbers mvolved at the time of the survey in May, 1981 and the corresponding numbers in the three committal prisons one year later on a single day in May, 1982. In 1981 there were 29 'serious' drug abusers in Mountjoy Male Prison, nine in St. Patricks Institution and three in Mountjoy Female Prison. The corresponding figures for 1982 are Mountjoy Male Prison 45, St. Patrick's Institution 18, and Mountjoy Female Prison six. These figures denote a considerable upward trend in the number of drug abusers being committed to prison.
Keywords:
DRUG USERS; PRISONERS
Series/Report no.:
PL; 1015

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGilmore, Thomasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Justice. Probation and Welfare Psychological Servicesen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-07T09:01:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-07T09:01:55Z-
dc.date.issued1982-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/237473-
dc.descriptionThirty-four offenders were interviewed from the three institutions, 22 from Mountjoy Male Prison, nine from St. Patrick's Institution and three from Mountjoy Female Prison. The age range of the group was 17 to 32 with an average age of 22.5 years. Seven of the total group of 34 were married (two separated) but 12 of the 34 subjects had children. Eighteen of the 34 were still residing in the parental home. In five cases the parents of the offender had separated and in five cases both parents had died. In a further two cases the mother only was dead and in a further three cases the father only was dead. In short, in 15 out of 34 cases the family of origin was not intact. Nineteen of the 34 subjects were from families with at least eight children and only five were from families with less than four children. Twenty-three of the total group had left school by 15 years of age and only one of the 34 had experienced schooling after the age of 16. Seventeen had never retained a job for more than one year and six of the remaining seventeen, who had experience of longer term employment, were in casual, part-time jobs. Of the 34 offenders four were serving sentences for crimes under the Misuse of Drugs Act. Seven were serving their first term in custody but altogether the 34 offenders had been sentenced to 102 separate terms of custody, only 11 of which were directly related to drug offences. The main drug of abuse for 28 of the total group was a narcotic analgesic and in 23 cases heroin was the most frequently used narcotic. Of the remaining six, one individual was addicted to barbiturates and five regularly used L.S.D. All the non-narcotic users were in the older Mountjoy Male Prison group. Twenty-three of the total had received methadone detoxification treatment after their arrival in prison. Eleven reported having suffered hepatitis and a further four spoke of jaundice but did not specify hepatitis. Seventeen of the 34 had at some point overdosed while eight reported that they had made at least one serious attempt at suicide. Of the group 11 had at least one brother or sister seriously abusing drugs and in five of these cases the sibling started drug abuse after the subject. 49 Eleven of the group claimed to have no experience of treatment whatsoever. However, 17 had undergone methadone detoxification outside the prison and ten of these on more than one occasion. Ten of the group, including two females , had experience of the Coolmine Therapeutic Community but five of the ten remained there for less than a week. Both females remained at Coolmine for seven months but the longest period spent there by a male was 2! months. In no case, therefore, was the complete programme of treatment experienced. Of the twenty seven offenders who had served a previous term of custody all returned to using drugs, though drug-free while in prison, and 19 were abusing drugs within one week of release. Twenty-three of the 34 subjects answered yes that they did intend to give up using drugs, however only six of these people really thought that they would never use drugs again. The other 11 subjects were virtually certain they would use drugs again. Finally, to give some indication of trends in the number of drug abusers b~ing committed to prison a comparison was made of the numbers mvolved at the time of the survey in May, 1981 and the corresponding numbers in the three committal prisons one year later on a single day in May, 1982. In 1981 there were 29 'serious' drug abusers in Mountjoy Male Prison, nine in St. Patricks Institution and three in Mountjoy Female Prison. The corresponding figures for 1982 are Mountjoy Male Prison 45, St. Patrick's Institution 18, and Mountjoy Female Prison six. These figures denote a considerable upward trend in the number of drug abusers being committed to prison.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherStationery Officeen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPLen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries1015en_GB
dc.subjectDRUG USERSen_GB
dc.subjectPRISONERSen_GB
dc.titleDrug abusers in the Dublin Committal System: a survey: a joint research projecten_GB
dc.typeOtheren
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