Emergency CT brain: preliminary interpretation with a tablet device: image quality and diagnostic performance of the Apple iPad.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/234892
Title:
Emergency CT brain: preliminary interpretation with a tablet device: image quality and diagnostic performance of the Apple iPad.
Authors:
Mc Laughlin, Patrick; Neill, Siobhan O; Fanning, Noel; Mc Garrigle, Anne Marie; Connor, Owen J O; Wyse, Gerry; Maher, Michael M
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Emergency CT brain: preliminary interpretation with a tablet device: image quality and diagnostic performance of the Apple iPad. 2012, 19 (2):127-33 Emerg Radiol
Journal:
Emergency radiology
Issue Date:
Apr-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/234892
DOI:
10.1007/s10140-011-1011-2
PubMed ID:
22173819
Abstract:
Tablet devices have recently been used in radiological image interpretation because they have a display resolution comparable to desktop LCD monitors. We identified a need to examine tablet display performance prior to their use in preliminary interpretation of radiological images. We compared the spatial and contrast resolution of a commercially available tablet display with a diagnostic grade 2 megapixel monochrome LCD using a contrast detail phantom. We also recorded reporting discrepancies, using the ACR RADPEER system, between preliminary interpretation of 100 emergency CT brain examinations on the tablet display and formal review on a diagnostic LCD. The iPad display performed inferiorly to the diagnostic monochrome display without the ability to zoom. When the software zoom function was enabled on the tablet device, comparable contrast detail phantom scores of 163 vs 165 points were achieved. No reporting discrepancies were encountered during the interpretation of 43 normal examinations and five cases of acute intracranial hemorrhage. There were seven RADPEER2 (understandable) misses when using the iPad display and 12 with the diagnostic LCD. Use of software zoom in the tablet device improved its contrast detail phantom score. The tablet allowed satisfactory identification of acute CT brain findings, but additional research will be required to examine the cause of "understandable" reporting discrepancies that occur when using tablet devices.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Brain; Computers, Handheld; Data Display; Emergencies; Humans; Phantoms, Imaging; Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Teleradiology; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; User-Computer Interface
ISSN:
1438-1435

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMc Laughlin, Patricken_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeill, Siobhan Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFanning, Noelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMc Garrigle, Anne Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Owen J Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWyse, Gerryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Michael Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-20T12:55:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-20T12:55:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-
dc.identifier.citationEmergency CT brain: preliminary interpretation with a tablet device: image quality and diagnostic performance of the Apple iPad. 2012, 19 (2):127-33 Emerg Radiolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1438-1435-
dc.identifier.pmid22173819-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10140-011-1011-2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/234892-
dc.description.abstractTablet devices have recently been used in radiological image interpretation because they have a display resolution comparable to desktop LCD monitors. We identified a need to examine tablet display performance prior to their use in preliminary interpretation of radiological images. We compared the spatial and contrast resolution of a commercially available tablet display with a diagnostic grade 2 megapixel monochrome LCD using a contrast detail phantom. We also recorded reporting discrepancies, using the ACR RADPEER system, between preliminary interpretation of 100 emergency CT brain examinations on the tablet display and formal review on a diagnostic LCD. The iPad display performed inferiorly to the diagnostic monochrome display without the ability to zoom. When the software zoom function was enabled on the tablet device, comparable contrast detail phantom scores of 163 vs 165 points were achieved. No reporting discrepancies were encountered during the interpretation of 43 normal examinations and five cases of acute intracranial hemorrhage. There were seven RADPEER2 (understandable) misses when using the iPad display and 12 with the diagnostic LCD. Use of software zoom in the tablet device improved its contrast detail phantom score. The tablet allowed satisfactory identification of acute CT brain findings, but additional research will be required to examine the cause of "understandable" reporting discrepancies that occur when using tablet devices.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Emergency radiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshBrain-
dc.subject.meshComputers, Handheld-
dc.subject.meshData Display-
dc.subject.meshEmergencies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshPhantoms, Imaging-
dc.subject.meshRadiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted-
dc.subject.meshTeleradiology-
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed-
dc.subject.meshUser-Computer Interface-
dc.titleEmergency CT brain: preliminary interpretation with a tablet device: image quality and diagnostic performance of the Apple iPad.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEmergency radiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunsteren

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.