Survey of the provision of crowns by dentists in Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/234801
Title:
Survey of the provision of crowns by dentists in Ireland.
Authors:
Rath, Claire; Sharpling, Bill; Millar, Brian J
Affiliation:
London Dental Education Centre, King's College London Dental Institute, London SE1 9NH.
Citation:
Survey of the provision of crowns by dentists in Ireland., 56 (4):178-85 J Ir Dent Assoc
Publisher:
Irish Dental Association
Journal:
Journal of the Irish Dental Association
Issue Date:
Aug-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/234801
PubMed ID:
20836426
Abstract:
The literature is limited on the detailed description of the practice of Irish general dentists in the provision of crowns.; To review the provision of crowns by dentists in Ireland and identify opportunities for improving current clinical practices.; A questionnaire was posted to 500 general dentists selected randomly from the Irish Dental Register and 150 responded. Twenty-three laboratories used by these dentists were subsequently surveyed.; The Vita Shade Guide was the most commonly used shade guide. Crowns were mainly fabricated using porcelain bonded to metal (51%) followed by all-ceramic (42%) and gold (5%). Plastic Solo trays were the preferred tray for impressions and the laboratory prescription form was the primary means of dentist-technician communication. Dentists and technicians have different preferences for impression trays, impression materials and bite registration, while a significant percentage of dentists (18%) admitted to not disinfecting impressions. Resin or resin-based cements are the preferred means of crown cementation.; This study suggests that the accuracy of restorations could be improved by: adopting a multi-technique approach to shade taking; replacing Solo trays with metal or custom trays for impression-taking; upgrading of the putty-wash technique by using a custom tray with a 2 mm spacer and a heavy-bodied/light-bodied silicone; and, using a two-cord retraction technique, perhaps in combination with electrosurgery or soft tissue laser, to improve marginal accuracy where indicated.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Communication; Cross Infection; Crowns; Dental Impression Technique; Dentist's Practice Patterns; Female; General Practice, Dental; Humans; Ireland; Laboratories, Dental; Male; Metal Ceramic Alloys; Middle Aged; Prosthesis Coloring; Questionnaires; Young Adult
ISSN:
0021-1133

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRath, Claireen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSharpling, Billen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMillar, Brian Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-20T08:57:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-20T08:57:49Z-
dc.date.issued2010-08-
dc.identifier.citationSurvey of the provision of crowns by dentists in Ireland., 56 (4):178-85 J Ir Dent Assocen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1133-
dc.identifier.pmid20836426-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/234801-
dc.description.abstractThe literature is limited on the detailed description of the practice of Irish general dentists in the provision of crowns.-
dc.description.abstractTo review the provision of crowns by dentists in Ireland and identify opportunities for improving current clinical practices.-
dc.description.abstractA questionnaire was posted to 500 general dentists selected randomly from the Irish Dental Register and 150 responded. Twenty-three laboratories used by these dentists were subsequently surveyed.-
dc.description.abstractThe Vita Shade Guide was the most commonly used shade guide. Crowns were mainly fabricated using porcelain bonded to metal (51%) followed by all-ceramic (42%) and gold (5%). Plastic Solo trays were the preferred tray for impressions and the laboratory prescription form was the primary means of dentist-technician communication. Dentists and technicians have different preferences for impression trays, impression materials and bite registration, while a significant percentage of dentists (18%) admitted to not disinfecting impressions. Resin or resin-based cements are the preferred means of crown cementation.-
dc.description.abstractThis study suggests that the accuracy of restorations could be improved by: adopting a multi-technique approach to shade taking; replacing Solo trays with metal or custom trays for impression-taking; upgrading of the putty-wash technique by using a custom tray with a 2 mm spacer and a heavy-bodied/light-bodied silicone; and, using a two-cord retraction technique, perhaps in combination with electrosurgery or soft tissue laser, to improve marginal accuracy where indicated.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Dental Associationen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of the Irish Dental Associationen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshCommunication-
dc.subject.meshCross Infection-
dc.subject.meshCrowns-
dc.subject.meshDental Impression Technique-
dc.subject.meshDentist's Practice Patterns-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGeneral Practice, Dental-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLaboratories, Dental-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMetal Ceramic Alloys-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshProsthesis Coloring-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleSurvey of the provision of crowns by dentists in Ireland.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLondon Dental Education Centre, King's College London Dental Institute, London SE1 9NH.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Irish Dental Associationen_GB
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