Social networking patterns/hazards among teenagers.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/234498
Title:
Social networking patterns/hazards among teenagers.
Authors:
Machold, C; Judge, G; Mavrinac, A; Elliott, J; Murphy, A M; Roche, E
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, AMNCH, Tallaght, Dublin 24. macholdc@tcd.ie
Citation:
Social networking patterns/hazards among teenagers. 2012, 105 (5):151-2 Ir Med J
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
May-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/234498
PubMed ID:
22803496
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Social%20Networking%20Patterns%2FHazards%20Among%20Irish%20Teenagers
Abstract:
Social Networking Sites (SNSs) have grown substantially, posing new hazards to teenagers. This study aimed to determine general patterns of Internet usage among Irish teenagers aged 11-16 years, and to identify potential hazards, including; bullying, inappropriate contact, overuse, addiction and invasion of users' privacy. A cross-sectional study design was employed to survey students at three Irish secondary schools, with a sample of 474 completing a questionnaire. 202 (44%) (n = 460) accessed the Internet using a shared home computer. Two hours or less were spent online daily by 285(62%), of whom 450 (98%) were unsupervised. 306 (72%) (n = 425) reported frequent usage of SNSs, 403 (95%) of whom were Facebook users. 42 (10%) males and 51 (12%) females experienced bullying online, while 114 (27%) reported inappropriate contact from others. Concerning overuse and the risk of addiction, 140 (33%) felt they accessed SNSs too often. These patterns among Irish teenagers suggest that SNS usage poses significant dangers, which are going largely unaddressed.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMachold, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJudge, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMavrinac, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorElliott, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, A Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Een_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-19T10:40:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-19T10:40:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.identifier.citationSocial networking patterns/hazards among teenagers. 2012, 105 (5):151-2 Ir Med Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid22803496-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/234498-
dc.description.abstractSocial Networking Sites (SNSs) have grown substantially, posing new hazards to teenagers. This study aimed to determine general patterns of Internet usage among Irish teenagers aged 11-16 years, and to identify potential hazards, including; bullying, inappropriate contact, overuse, addiction and invasion of users' privacy. A cross-sectional study design was employed to survey students at three Irish secondary schools, with a sample of 474 completing a questionnaire. 202 (44%) (n = 460) accessed the Internet using a shared home computer. Two hours or less were spent online daily by 285(62%), of whom 450 (98%) were unsupervised. 306 (72%) (n = 425) reported frequent usage of SNSs, 403 (95%) of whom were Facebook users. 42 (10%) males and 51 (12%) females experienced bullying online, while 114 (27%) reported inappropriate contact from others. Concerning overuse and the risk of addiction, 140 (33%) felt they accessed SNSs too often. These patterns among Irish teenagers suggest that SNS usage poses significant dangers, which are going largely unaddressed.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Social%20Networking%20Patterns%2FHazards%20Among%20Irish%20Teenagersen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.titleSocial networking patterns/hazards among teenagers.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Paediatrics, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, AMNCH, Tallaght, Dublin 24. macholdc@tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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