Self-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/232945
Title:
Self-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain.
Authors:
Smart, Keith M; Blake, Catherine; Staines, Anthony; Doody, Catherine
Affiliation:
St Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4, Ireland. k.smart@svuh.ie
Citation:
Self-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain. 2012, 17 (2):119-25 Man Ther
Journal:
Manual therapy
Issue Date:
Apr-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/232945
DOI:
10.1016/j.math.2011.10.002
PubMed ID:
22074733
Abstract:
Evidence of validity is required to support the use of mechanisms-based classifications of pain clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminant validity of 'nociceptive' (NP), 'peripheral neuropathic' (PNP) and 'central sensitisation' (CSP) as mechanisms-based classifications of pain in patients with low back (±leg) pain by evaluating the extent to which patients classified in this way differ from one another according to health measures associated with various dimensions of pain. This study employed a cross-sectional, between-subjects design. Four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (±leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Clinicians classified each patient's pain using a mechanisms-based classification approach. Patients completed a number of self-report measures associated with pain severity, health-related quality of life, functional disability, anxiety and depression. Discriminant validity was evaluated using a multivariate analysis of variance. There was a statistically significant difference between pain classifications on the combined self-report measures, (p = .001; Pillai's Trace = .33; partial eta squared = .16). Patients classified with CSP (n = 106) reported significantly more severe pain, poorer general health-related quality of life, and greater levels of back pain-related disability, depression and anxiety compared to those classified with PNP (n = 102) and NP (n = 256). A similar pattern was found in patients with PNP compared to NP. Mechanisms-based pain classifications may reflect meaningful differences in attributes underlying the multidimensionality of pain. Further studies are required to evaluate the construct and criterion validity of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Analysis of Variance; Anxiety; Central Nervous System Sensitization; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression; Disability Evaluation; Discriminant Analysis; Female; Humans; Leg; Low Back Pain; Male; Musculoskeletal Pain; Pain Measurement; Peripheral Nervous System Diseases; Quality of Life
ISSN:
1532-2769

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmart, Keith Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorBlake, Catherineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStaines, Anthonyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoody, Catherineen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-10T14:33:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-10T14:33:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-
dc.identifier.citationSelf-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain. 2012, 17 (2):119-25 Man Theren_GB
dc.identifier.issn1532-2769-
dc.identifier.pmid22074733-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.math.2011.10.002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/232945-
dc.description.abstractEvidence of validity is required to support the use of mechanisms-based classifications of pain clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminant validity of 'nociceptive' (NP), 'peripheral neuropathic' (PNP) and 'central sensitisation' (CSP) as mechanisms-based classifications of pain in patients with low back (±leg) pain by evaluating the extent to which patients classified in this way differ from one another according to health measures associated with various dimensions of pain. This study employed a cross-sectional, between-subjects design. Four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (±leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Clinicians classified each patient's pain using a mechanisms-based classification approach. Patients completed a number of self-report measures associated with pain severity, health-related quality of life, functional disability, anxiety and depression. Discriminant validity was evaluated using a multivariate analysis of variance. There was a statistically significant difference between pain classifications on the combined self-report measures, (p = .001; Pillai's Trace = .33; partial eta squared = .16). Patients classified with CSP (n = 106) reported significantly more severe pain, poorer general health-related quality of life, and greater levels of back pain-related disability, depression and anxiety compared to those classified with PNP (n = 102) and NP (n = 256). A similar pattern was found in patients with PNP compared to NP. Mechanisms-based pain classifications may reflect meaningful differences in attributes underlying the multidimensionality of pain. Further studies are required to evaluate the construct and criterion validity of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Manual therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subject.meshAnxiety-
dc.subject.meshCentral Nervous System Sensitization-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshDepression-
dc.subject.meshDisability Evaluation-
dc.subject.meshDiscriminant Analysis-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLeg-
dc.subject.meshLow Back Pain-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMusculoskeletal Pain-
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement-
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Nervous System Diseases-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life-
dc.titleSelf-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSt Vincent's University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4, Ireland. k.smart@svuh.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalManual therapyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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