Maternal and infant nutritional supplementation practices in Ireland: implications for clinicians and policymakers.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/232672
Title:
Maternal and infant nutritional supplementation practices in Ireland: implications for clinicians and policymakers.
Authors:
Tarrant, R C; Sheridan-Pereira, M; McCarthy, R A; Younger, K M; Kearney, J M
Affiliation:
Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin 12.
Citation:
Maternal and infant nutritional supplementation practices in Ireland: implications for clinicians and policymakers. 2011, 104 (6):173-7 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Jun-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/232672
PubMed ID:
22111393
Abstract:
This prospective Irish observational study examined maternal and infant nutritional supplement use. From an initial sample of 539 mothers recruited from the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital in Dublin (during 2004-2006), 450 eligible mothers were followed up at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Only 200 women (44.4%) complied with peri-conceptional folic acid at the recommended time with strong social patterning associated with its uptake. Almost 10% of the sample (n = 44) consumed a combined multivitamin and mineral supplement during pregnancy. A vitamin D-containing supplement was provided to only 5 (1.1%) and 15 (3.3%) infants at 6 weeks and 6 months, respectively. A national guideline that advises on adequate and safe use of both vitamin and multivitamin supplements during pregnancy with particular reference to vitamin A and D is warranted. Given the re-emergence of rickets in Ireland, and the reported morbidities associated with vitamin D insufficiency, promoting and monitoring compliance with 200 IU [5 microg] daily vitamin D supplements to all infants particularly those from higher risk groups from birth to 1 year, should be a public health priority.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Congenital Abnormalities; Demography; Dietary Supplements; Female; Folic Acid; Health Priorities; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Ireland; Logistic Models; Minerals; Nutrition Disorders; Observation; Pregnancy; Prospective Studies; Vitamin D; Vitamins
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, R Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSheridan-Pereira, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, R Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYounger, K Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorKearney, J Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-09T15:45:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-09T15:45:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-06-
dc.identifier.citationMaternal and infant nutritional supplementation practices in Ireland: implications for clinicians and policymakers. 2011, 104 (6):173-7 Ir Med Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid22111393-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/232672-
dc.description.abstractThis prospective Irish observational study examined maternal and infant nutritional supplement use. From an initial sample of 539 mothers recruited from the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital in Dublin (during 2004-2006), 450 eligible mothers were followed up at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Only 200 women (44.4%) complied with peri-conceptional folic acid at the recommended time with strong social patterning associated with its uptake. Almost 10% of the sample (n = 44) consumed a combined multivitamin and mineral supplement during pregnancy. A vitamin D-containing supplement was provided to only 5 (1.1%) and 15 (3.3%) infants at 6 weeks and 6 months, respectively. A national guideline that advises on adequate and safe use of both vitamin and multivitamin supplements during pregnancy with particular reference to vitamin A and D is warranted. Given the re-emergence of rickets in Ireland, and the reported morbidities associated with vitamin D insufficiency, promoting and monitoring compliance with 200 IU [5 microg] daily vitamin D supplements to all infants particularly those from higher risk groups from birth to 1 year, should be a public health priority.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCongenital Abnormalities-
dc.subject.meshDemography-
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplements-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFolic Acid-
dc.subject.meshHealth Priorities-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models-
dc.subject.meshMinerals-
dc.subject.meshNutrition Disorders-
dc.subject.meshObservation-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshVitamin D-
dc.subject.meshVitamins-
dc.titleMaternal and infant nutritional supplementation practices in Ireland: implications for clinicians and policymakers.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentOur Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin 12.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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