A national study of the retention of Irish opiate users in methadone substitution treatment

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/232654
Title:
A national study of the retention of Irish opiate users in methadone substitution treatment
Authors:
Mullen, Louise; Barry, Joseph; Long, Jean; Keenan, Eamon; Mulholland, Deirdre; Grogan, Loretto; Delargy, Ide
Affiliation:
Health Services Executive, Dr. Steeven's Hospital , Dublin , Ireland.
Citation:
A National Study of the Retention of Irish Opiate Users in Methadone Substitution Treatment. 2012:notAm J Drug Alcohol Abuse
Journal:
The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse
Issue Date:
2-Jul-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/232654
DOI:
10.3109/00952990.2012.694516
PubMed ID:
22747484
Abstract:
Background: Retention in treatment is a key indicator of methadone treatment success. The study aims to identify factors that are associated with retention. Objectives: To determine retention in treatment at 12 months for Irish opiate users in methadone substitution treatment and to indicate factors that increase the likelihood of retention. Methods: National cohort study of randomly selected opiate users commencing methadone treatment in 1999, 2001, and 2003 (n = 1269). Results: Sixty-one percent of patients attending methadone treatment remained in continuous treatment for more than 1 year. Retention in treatment at 12 months was associated with age, gender, facility type, and methadone dose. Age and gender were no longer significant when adjusted for other variables in the model. Those who attended a specialist site were twice as likely to leave methadone treatment within 12 months compared with those who attended a primary care physician. The most important predictor of retention in treatment was methadone dose. Those who received <60 mg of methadone were three times more likely to leave treatment. Conclusion: Retention in methadone treatment is high in Ireland in a variety of settings. The main factors influencing retention in methadone treatment was an adequate methadone dose and access to a range of treatment settings including from primary care physicians. Scientific Significance: Providing an adequate dose of methadone during treatment will increase the likelihood of treatment retention. Methadone treatment by the primary care physician is a successful method of retaining opioid users in treatment.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; HEALTH SERVICE PLANNING
ISSN:
1097-9891

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMullen, Louiseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Josephen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLong, Jeanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeenan, Eamonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMulholland, Deirdreen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrogan, Lorettoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDelargy, Ideen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-09T15:01:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-09T15:01:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012-07-02-
dc.identifier.citationA National Study of the Retention of Irish Opiate Users in Methadone Substitution Treatment. 2012:notAm J Drug Alcohol Abuseen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1097-9891-
dc.identifier.pmid22747484-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/00952990.2012.694516-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/232654-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Retention in treatment is a key indicator of methadone treatment success. The study aims to identify factors that are associated with retention. Objectives: To determine retention in treatment at 12 months for Irish opiate users in methadone substitution treatment and to indicate factors that increase the likelihood of retention. Methods: National cohort study of randomly selected opiate users commencing methadone treatment in 1999, 2001, and 2003 (n = 1269). Results: Sixty-one percent of patients attending methadone treatment remained in continuous treatment for more than 1 year. Retention in treatment at 12 months was associated with age, gender, facility type, and methadone dose. Age and gender were no longer significant when adjusted for other variables in the model. Those who attended a specialist site were twice as likely to leave methadone treatment within 12 months compared with those who attended a primary care physician. The most important predictor of retention in treatment was methadone dose. Those who received <60 mg of methadone were three times more likely to leave treatment. Conclusion: Retention in methadone treatment is high in Ireland in a variety of settings. The main factors influencing retention in methadone treatment was an adequate methadone dose and access to a range of treatment settings including from primary care physicians. Scientific Significance: Providing an adequate dose of methadone during treatment will increase the likelihood of treatment retention. Methadone treatment by the primary care physician is a successful method of retaining opioid users in treatment.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The American journal of drug and alcohol abuseen_GB
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT-
dc.subject.otherHEALTH SERVICE PLANNING-
dc.titleA national study of the retention of Irish opiate users in methadone substitution treatmenten_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Services Executive, Dr. Steeven's Hospital , Dublin , Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe American journal of drug and alcohol abuseen_GB

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