2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/231914
Title:
Homeless truths: children's experiences of homelessness in Ireland
Authors:
Ombudsman for Children and Young People
Publisher:
Ombudsman for Children and Young People
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/231914
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The Ombudsman for Children’s Office is the independent national human rights institution with a statutory mandate to promote and monitor children’s rights. One of the functions of the Office includes monitoring the operation of legislation in relation to children. The Child Care Act, 1991 includes a focus on the needs of homeless children. Under Section 5 of the 1991 Act, the Health Service Executive (HSE) has statutory responsibility for the provision of suitable accommodation to children up to the age of 18 who are homeless and in need of emergency care. Section 5 of the 1991 Act states that:Where it appears to a health board that a child in its area is homeless, the board shall enquire into the child’s circumstances, and if the board is satisfied that there is no accommodation available to him which he can reasonably occupy, then, unless the child is received into the care of the board under the provisions of this Act, the board shall take such steps as are reasonable to make available suitable accommodation for him. A number of other provisions of the 1991 Act are also relevant to the issue of youth homelessness. Section 45 of the 1991 Act provides that, where a child in the care of the State reaches the age of 18, the HSE may continue to provide support to him/her in a variety of ways until s/he reaches the age of 21. In this regard, Section 45(2) provides that the HSE may arrange accommodation or liaise with local housing authorities in respect of housing for children leaving care. Furthermore, Section 8 of the 1991 Act requires the HSE to produce an annual report on the adequacy of childcare and family support services and includes an explicit requirement that the HSE give consideration to children who are homeless.
Keywords:
CHILD WELFARE; HOMELESSNESS
ISBN:
9781907074226

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOmbudsman for Children and Young Peopleen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-03T14:43:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-03T14:43:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.isbn9781907074226-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/231914-
dc.descriptionThe Ombudsman for Children’s Office is the independent national human rights institution with a statutory mandate to promote and monitor children’s rights. One of the functions of the Office includes monitoring the operation of legislation in relation to children. The Child Care Act, 1991 includes a focus on the needs of homeless children. Under Section 5 of the 1991 Act, the Health Service Executive (HSE) has statutory responsibility for the provision of suitable accommodation to children up to the age of 18 who are homeless and in need of emergency care. Section 5 of the 1991 Act states that:Where it appears to a health board that a child in its area is homeless, the board shall enquire into the child’s circumstances, and if the board is satisfied that there is no accommodation available to him which he can reasonably occupy, then, unless the child is received into the care of the board under the provisions of this Act, the board shall take such steps as are reasonable to make available suitable accommodation for him. A number of other provisions of the 1991 Act are also relevant to the issue of youth homelessness. Section 45 of the 1991 Act provides that, where a child in the care of the State reaches the age of 18, the HSE may continue to provide support to him/her in a variety of ways until s/he reaches the age of 21. In this regard, Section 45(2) provides that the HSE may arrange accommodation or liaise with local housing authorities in respect of housing for children leaving care. Furthermore, Section 8 of the 1991 Act requires the HSE to produce an annual report on the adequacy of childcare and family support services and includes an explicit requirement that the HSE give consideration to children who are homeless.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOmbudsman for Children and Young Peopleen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD WELFAREen_GB
dc.subjectHOMELESSNESSen_GB
dc.titleHomeless truths: children's experiences of homelessness in Irelanden_GB
dc.typeReporten
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