The neuroproteomics of schizophrenia.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/231532
Title:
The neuroproteomics of schizophrenia.
Authors:
English, Jane A; Pennington, Kyla; Dunn, Michael J; Cotter, David R
Affiliation:
Proteome Research Centre, UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, School of Medicine, and Medical Sciences, University College Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
The neuroproteomics of schizophrenia. 2011, 69 (2):163-72 Biol. Psychiatry
Journal:
Biological psychiatry
Issue Date:
15-Jan-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/231532
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.06.031
PubMed ID:
20887976
Abstract:
Proteomics is the study of global gene expression of an organ, body system, fluid, or cellular compartment at the protein level. Proteomic findings are reflective of complex gene × environment interactions, and the importance of this is increasingly appreciated in schizophrenia research. In this review, we outline the main proteomic methods available to researchers in this area and summarize, for the first time, the findings of the main quantitative neuroproteomic investigations of schizophrenia brain. Our review of these data revealed 16 gray matter proteins, and eight white matter proteins that were differentially expressed in the same direction in two or more investigations. Pathway analysis identified cellular assembly and organization as particularly disrupted in both gray and white matter, whereas the glycolysis-gluconeogenesis pathway was the major signaling pathway significantly altered in both. Reassuringly, these findings show remarkable convergence with functional pathways and positional candidate genes implicated from genomic studies. The specificity of schizophrenia proteomic findings are also addressed in the context of neuroproteomic investigations of neurodegenerative disorders and bipolar disorder. Finally, we discuss the major challenges in the field of neuroproteomics, such as the need for high throughput validation methods and optimal sample preparation. Future directions in the neuroproteomics of schizophrenia, including the use of blood-based biomarker work, the need to focus on subproteomes, and the increasing use of mass spectrometry-based methods are all discussed. This area of research is still in its infancy and offers huge potential to our understanding of schizophrenia on a cellular level.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Autopsy; Brain; Brain Chemistry; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Nerve Tissue Proteins; Neuropsychiatry; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Postmortem Changes; Proteomics; Schizophrenia
ISSN:
1873-2402

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEnglish, Jane Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPennington, Kylaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Michael Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCotter, David Ren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-29T14:06:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-29T14:06:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-01-15-
dc.identifier.citationThe neuroproteomics of schizophrenia. 2011, 69 (2):163-72 Biol. Psychiatryen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1873-2402-
dc.identifier.pmid20887976-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.06.031-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/231532-
dc.description.abstractProteomics is the study of global gene expression of an organ, body system, fluid, or cellular compartment at the protein level. Proteomic findings are reflective of complex gene × environment interactions, and the importance of this is increasingly appreciated in schizophrenia research. In this review, we outline the main proteomic methods available to researchers in this area and summarize, for the first time, the findings of the main quantitative neuroproteomic investigations of schizophrenia brain. Our review of these data revealed 16 gray matter proteins, and eight white matter proteins that were differentially expressed in the same direction in two or more investigations. Pathway analysis identified cellular assembly and organization as particularly disrupted in both gray and white matter, whereas the glycolysis-gluconeogenesis pathway was the major signaling pathway significantly altered in both. Reassuringly, these findings show remarkable convergence with functional pathways and positional candidate genes implicated from genomic studies. The specificity of schizophrenia proteomic findings are also addressed in the context of neuroproteomic investigations of neurodegenerative disorders and bipolar disorder. Finally, we discuss the major challenges in the field of neuroproteomics, such as the need for high throughput validation methods and optimal sample preparation. Future directions in the neuroproteomics of schizophrenia, including the use of blood-based biomarker work, the need to focus on subproteomes, and the increasing use of mass spectrometry-based methods are all discussed. This area of research is still in its infancy and offers huge potential to our understanding of schizophrenia on a cellular level.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Biological psychiatryen_GB
dc.subject.meshAutopsy-
dc.subject.meshBrain-
dc.subject.meshBrain Chemistry-
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Profiling-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNerve Tissue Proteins-
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychiatry-
dc.subject.meshOligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis-
dc.subject.meshPostmortem Changes-
dc.subject.meshProteomics-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia-
dc.titleThe neuroproteomics of schizophrenia.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentProteome Research Centre, UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, School of Medicine, and Medical Sciences, University College Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBiological psychiatryen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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