Evaluation of different methods to recover methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from hospital environmental surfaces.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/229157
Title:
Evaluation of different methods to recover methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from hospital environmental surfaces.
Authors:
Dolan, A; Bartlett, M; McEntee, B; Creamer, E; Humphreys, H
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. anthony.dolan@biotrin.ie
Citation:
Evaluation of different methods to recover meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from hospital environmental surfaces. 2011, 79 (3):227-30 J. Hosp. Infect.
Journal:
The Journal of hospital infection
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/229157
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2011.05.011
PubMed ID:
21742414
Abstract:
The environment is implicated as a source of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and there is a need for evidence-based approaches to environmental sampling to assess cleanliness and improve infection prevention and control. We assessed, in vitro, different approaches to sampling the environment for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In a laboratory-based investigation, the recovery of MRSA from two common hospital environments using six different sampling methods was evaluated, with a wild-type strain of MRSA. A 100 cm(2) section of mattress and a laboratory bench surface were contaminated with known inocula of MRSA. Bacteria were recovered by sampling at 30 min after inoculation, using either saline-moistened cotton swabs, neutralising buffer swabs, eSwabs or macrofoam swabs, which were all enriched in tryptone soya broth, or by sampling with direct contact plates or chromogenic 'sweep' plates. The sensitivity (i.e. the minimum number of bacteria inoculated on to a surface which subsequently produced a positive result) of each method was determined for each surface. The most sensitive methods were eSwabs and macrofoam swabs, requiring 6.1 × 10(-1) and 3.9 × 10(-1) MRSA/cm(2), respectively, to produce a positive result from the bench surface. The least sensitive swabbing method was saline-moistened cotton swabs, requiring 1.1 × 10(3) MRSA/cm(2) of mattress. The recovery of bacteria from environmental samples varies with the swabs and methodology used and negative culture results do not exclude a pathogen-free environment. Greater standardisation is required to facilitate the assessment of cleanliness of healthcare environments.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Bacteriological Techniques; Bedding and Linens; Colony Count, Microbial; Culture Media; Environmental Monitoring; Equipment Contamination; Equipment and Supplies, Hospital; Fomites; Hospitals; Humans; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Sensitivity and Specificity; Specimen Handling; Staphylococcus aureus
ISSN:
1532-2939

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcEntee, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorCreamer, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, Hen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-15T15:36:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-15T15:36:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationEvaluation of different methods to recover meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from hospital environmental surfaces. 2011, 79 (3):227-30 J. Hosp. Infect.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1532-2939-
dc.identifier.pmid21742414-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jhin.2011.05.011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/229157-
dc.description.abstractThe environment is implicated as a source of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and there is a need for evidence-based approaches to environmental sampling to assess cleanliness and improve infection prevention and control. We assessed, in vitro, different approaches to sampling the environment for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In a laboratory-based investigation, the recovery of MRSA from two common hospital environments using six different sampling methods was evaluated, with a wild-type strain of MRSA. A 100 cm(2) section of mattress and a laboratory bench surface were contaminated with known inocula of MRSA. Bacteria were recovered by sampling at 30 min after inoculation, using either saline-moistened cotton swabs, neutralising buffer swabs, eSwabs or macrofoam swabs, which were all enriched in tryptone soya broth, or by sampling with direct contact plates or chromogenic 'sweep' plates. The sensitivity (i.e. the minimum number of bacteria inoculated on to a surface which subsequently produced a positive result) of each method was determined for each surface. The most sensitive methods were eSwabs and macrofoam swabs, requiring 6.1 × 10(-1) and 3.9 × 10(-1) MRSA/cm(2), respectively, to produce a positive result from the bench surface. The least sensitive swabbing method was saline-moistened cotton swabs, requiring 1.1 × 10(3) MRSA/cm(2) of mattress. The recovery of bacteria from environmental samples varies with the swabs and methodology used and negative culture results do not exclude a pathogen-free environment. Greater standardisation is required to facilitate the assessment of cleanliness of healthcare environments.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of hospital infectionen_GB
dc.subject.meshBacteriological Techniques-
dc.subject.meshBedding and Linens-
dc.subject.meshColony Count, Microbial-
dc.subject.meshCulture Media-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring-
dc.subject.meshEquipment Contamination-
dc.subject.meshEquipment and Supplies, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshFomites-
dc.subject.meshHospitals-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus-
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificity-
dc.subject.meshSpecimen Handling-
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcus aureus-
dc.titleEvaluation of different methods to recover methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from hospital environmental surfaces.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Microbiology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. anthony.dolan@biotrin.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of hospital infectionen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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