An investigation of the subtype diversity of clinical isolates of Irish Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078 by repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/229133
Title:
An investigation of the subtype diversity of clinical isolates of Irish Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078 by repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR.
Authors:
Solomon, K; Murray, S; Scott, L; McDermott, S; Drudy, D; Martin, A; O'Donoghue, C; Skally, M; Burns, K; Fenelon, L; Fitzpatrick, F; Kyne, L; Fanning, S
Affiliation:
UCD Veterinary Sciences Centre, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. katie.solomon@ucd.ie
Citation:
An investigation of the subtype diversity of clinical isolates of Irish Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078 by repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR. 2011, 60 (Pt 8):1080-7 J. Med. Microbiol.
Journal:
Journal of medical microbiology
Issue Date:
Aug-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/229133
DOI:
10.1099/jmm.0.029983-0
PubMed ID:
21459905
Abstract:
A repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) subtyping method (DiversiLab) in conjunction with ribotyping, toxinotyping and antimicrobial-susceptibility testing was used to detect subtypes within Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078. Clinical isolates of ribotypes 027 (toxinotype III) (n = 30) and 078 (toxinotype V) (n = 23) were provided by health-care facilities across the Republic of Ireland over 2 months in 2006 and 1 month in 2009. Ribotype 027 isolates were significantly more related to each other (9 different subtype profiles) when compared to ribotype 078 isolates (14 different profiles) (P = 0.001; cut-off >90 % similarity). Almost half of ribotype 078 isolates (45.5 %) showed no relationship to each other. The clonality of ribotype 027 isolates suggests effective adaptation to the human niche, whereas the considerable genetic diversity within ribotype 078 isolates suggests that they may have originated from a variety of sources. Subtyping correlated well with antimicrobial susceptibility, in particular clindamycin susceptibility for ribotype 027, but diverse antimicrobial-susceptibility profiles were seen in ribotype 078 isolates, even within a single health-care facility. Between 2006 and 2009, a change in the predominant subtype of ribotype 027 was seen, with the recent clone representing half of all ribotype 027 isolates studied. This strain exhibited 89 % similarity to a rep-PCR profile of the North American NAP-1 strain.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Anti-Bacterial Agents; Clostridium Infections; Clostridium difficile; DNA, Bacterial; Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Genetic Variation; Genotype; Hospitals; Humans; Inverted Repeat Sequences; Ireland; Phylogeny; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Ribotyping; Time Factors
ISSN:
1473-5644

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorScott, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDrudy, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Donoghue, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSkally, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorFenelon, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKyne, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorFanning, Sen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-15T13:26:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-15T13:26:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-08-
dc.identifier.citationAn investigation of the subtype diversity of clinical isolates of Irish Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078 by repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR. 2011, 60 (Pt 8):1080-7 J. Med. Microbiol.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1473-5644-
dc.identifier.pmid21459905-
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.029983-0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/229133-
dc.description.abstractA repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) subtyping method (DiversiLab) in conjunction with ribotyping, toxinotyping and antimicrobial-susceptibility testing was used to detect subtypes within Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078. Clinical isolates of ribotypes 027 (toxinotype III) (n = 30) and 078 (toxinotype V) (n = 23) were provided by health-care facilities across the Republic of Ireland over 2 months in 2006 and 1 month in 2009. Ribotype 027 isolates were significantly more related to each other (9 different subtype profiles) when compared to ribotype 078 isolates (14 different profiles) (P = 0.001; cut-off >90 % similarity). Almost half of ribotype 078 isolates (45.5 %) showed no relationship to each other. The clonality of ribotype 027 isolates suggests effective adaptation to the human niche, whereas the considerable genetic diversity within ribotype 078 isolates suggests that they may have originated from a variety of sources. Subtyping correlated well with antimicrobial susceptibility, in particular clindamycin susceptibility for ribotype 027, but diverse antimicrobial-susceptibility profiles were seen in ribotype 078 isolates, even within a single health-care facility. Between 2006 and 2009, a change in the predominant subtype of ribotype 027 was seen, with the recent clone representing half of all ribotype 027 isolates studied. This strain exhibited 89 % similarity to a rep-PCR profile of the North American NAP-1 strain.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of medical microbiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents-
dc.subject.meshClostridium Infections-
dc.subject.meshClostridium difficile-
dc.subject.meshDNA, Bacterial-
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Bacterial-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variation-
dc.subject.meshGenotype-
dc.subject.meshHospitals-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInverted Repeat Sequences-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshPhylogeny-
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reaction-
dc.subject.meshRibotyping-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.titleAn investigation of the subtype diversity of clinical isolates of Irish Clostridium difficile ribotypes 027 and 078 by repetitive-extragenic palindromic PCR.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUCD Veterinary Sciences Centre, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. katie.solomon@ucd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of medical microbiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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