High morbidity and mortality associated with an outbreak of influenza A(H3N2) in a psycho-geriatric facility.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/228852
Title:
High morbidity and mortality associated with an outbreak of influenza A(H3N2) in a psycho-geriatric facility.
Authors:
Sayers, G; Igoe, D; Carr, M; Cosgrave, M; Duffy, M; Crowley, B; O'Herlihy, B
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
High morbidity and mortality associated with an outbreak of influenza A(H3N2) in a psycho-geriatric facility. 2012:1-9notEpidemiol Infect
Journal:
Epidemiology and infection
Issue Date:
17-Apr-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/228852
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268812000659
PubMed ID:
22672856
Abstract:
SUMMARYIn spring 2008, an influenza A subtype H3N2 outbreak occurred in a long stay psycho-geriatric ward and two wards in the intellectual disability services (IDS), part of a large psychiatric hospital. The attack rate in the index ward was 90% (18/20) for patients and 35% (7/20) for staff. It was 14% (1/7) and 17% (2/12) in the affected IDS wards for patients and 0% (0/20) and 4% (1/25) for staff. Many of the laboratory-confirmed cases did not have a fever >38°C, a typical sign of influenza. Control measures included oseltamivir treatment for cases and prophylaxis for contacts, standard and droplet infection control precautions, active surveillance for early detection and isolation of potential cases. As a result, the outbreak did not spread throughout the hospital. Although the staff vaccination rate (10%) prior to the outbreak was low, we observed a much lower vaccine effectiveness rate in the patients (11%) than in the staff (100%) in the index ward. Vaccination of residents and staff of such facilities remains the key influenza prevention strategy.
Item Type:
Article
Keywords:
HEALTH PROTECTION
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; INFECTIOUS DISEASES
ISSN:
1469-4409

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSayers, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIgoe, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorCosgrave, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrowley, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Herlihy, Ben_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-13T16:21:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-13T16:21:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-17-
dc.identifier.citationHigh morbidity and mortality associated with an outbreak of influenza A(H3N2) in a psycho-geriatric facility. 2012:1-9notEpidemiol Infecten_GB
dc.identifier.issn1469-4409-
dc.identifier.pmid22672856-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268812000659-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/228852-
dc.description.abstractSUMMARYIn spring 2008, an influenza A subtype H3N2 outbreak occurred in a long stay psycho-geriatric ward and two wards in the intellectual disability services (IDS), part of a large psychiatric hospital. The attack rate in the index ward was 90% (18/20) for patients and 35% (7/20) for staff. It was 14% (1/7) and 17% (2/12) in the affected IDS wards for patients and 0% (0/20) and 4% (1/25) for staff. Many of the laboratory-confirmed cases did not have a fever >38°C, a typical sign of influenza. Control measures included oseltamivir treatment for cases and prophylaxis for contacts, standard and droplet infection control precautions, active surveillance for early detection and isolation of potential cases. As a result, the outbreak did not spread throughout the hospital. Although the staff vaccination rate (10%) prior to the outbreak was low, we observed a much lower vaccine effectiveness rate in the patients (11%) than in the staff (100%) in the index ward. Vaccination of residents and staff of such facilities remains the key influenza prevention strategy.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epidemiology and infectionen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH PROTECTIONEN
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen
dc.subject.otherINFECTIOUS DISEASESen
dc.titleHigh morbidity and mortality associated with an outbreak of influenza A(H3N2) in a psycho-geriatric facility.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Public Health, Health Service Executive, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and infectionen_GB

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