'Not enough people to look after you': an exploration of women's experiences of childbirth in the Republic of Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/227491
Title:
'Not enough people to look after you': an exploration of women's experiences of childbirth in the Republic of Ireland.
Authors:
Larkin, Patricia; Begley, Cecily M; Devane, Declan
Affiliation:
School of Health and Science, Scoil na Sláinte agus na hEolaíochta, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Dundalk, Co., Louth, Ireland. patricia.larkin@dkit.ie
Citation:
'Not enough people to look after you': an exploration of women's experiences of childbirth in the Republic of Ireland. 2012, 28 (1):98-105 Midwifery
Journal:
Midwifery
Issue Date:
Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/227491
DOI:
10.1016/j.midw.2010.11.007
PubMed ID:
21237541
Abstract:
Women's experiences of childbirth have far reaching implications for their health and that of their babies. This paper describes an exploration of women's experiences of childbirth in the Republic of Ireland.; A qualitative descriptive study consisting of focus group interviews (FGIs) identified important aspects of women's childbirth experiences.; Four randomly selected maternity units in the Republic of Ireland. The pilot study unit was also included in the data collection.; A convenience sample of 25 women who volunteered to participate in five focus group interviews. Eligible participants were >18 years, able to discuss their birth experiences in English, had experienced labour, and had a live healthy baby.; Approximately three months following the birth, data were collected using a conversational low moderator style focus group interviews.; Three main themes were identified, 'getting started', 'getting there' and 'consequences'. Women experienced labour in a variety of contexts and with differing aspirations. Midwives played a pivotal role in enabling or disempowering positive experiences. Control was an important element of childbirth experiences. Women often felt alone and unsupported. The busyness of the hospital units precluded women centred care both in early labour and in the period following the birth. Some women would not have another baby due to their childbirth experiences.; The context within which women give birth in the Republic of Ireland is important to their birth experiences. Although positive experiences were reported many women felt anxious and isolated. Busy environments added to women's fears and participants appeared to accept the lack of support as inevitable. Midwives play a pivotal role in helping women achieve a positive birth experience.; Excluding women's views from service evaluation renders an incomplete and somewhat distorted depiction of childbirth in Ireland. Although women appear to be satisfied with a live healthy baby, the process of 'getting there' has an emotional and psychological dimension that is important to the experience. Measuring the quality of maternity services must encompass recognition of psychological and emotional well-being alongside physical safety.
Item Type:
Preprint
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Anecdotes as Topic; Continuity of Patient Care; Delivery, Obstetric; Female; Health Services Research; Humans; Interpersonal Relations; Ireland; Maternal Health Services; Mothers; Patient Acceptance of Health Care; Patient Satisfaction; Pilot Projects; Postnatal Care; Postpartum Period; Pregnancy; Professional-Patient Relations; Social Support; Young Adult
ISSN:
1532-3099

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Patriciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBegley, Cecily Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorDevane, Declanen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-05T08:16:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-05T08:16:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-
dc.identifier.citation'Not enough people to look after you': an exploration of women's experiences of childbirth in the Republic of Ireland. 2012, 28 (1):98-105 Midwiferyen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1532-3099-
dc.identifier.pmid21237541-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.midw.2010.11.007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/227491-
dc.description.abstractWomen's experiences of childbirth have far reaching implications for their health and that of their babies. This paper describes an exploration of women's experiences of childbirth in the Republic of Ireland.-
dc.description.abstractA qualitative descriptive study consisting of focus group interviews (FGIs) identified important aspects of women's childbirth experiences.-
dc.description.abstractFour randomly selected maternity units in the Republic of Ireland. The pilot study unit was also included in the data collection.-
dc.description.abstractA convenience sample of 25 women who volunteered to participate in five focus group interviews. Eligible participants were >18 years, able to discuss their birth experiences in English, had experienced labour, and had a live healthy baby.-
dc.description.abstractApproximately three months following the birth, data were collected using a conversational low moderator style focus group interviews.-
dc.description.abstractThree main themes were identified, 'getting started', 'getting there' and 'consequences'. Women experienced labour in a variety of contexts and with differing aspirations. Midwives played a pivotal role in enabling or disempowering positive experiences. Control was an important element of childbirth experiences. Women often felt alone and unsupported. The busyness of the hospital units precluded women centred care both in early labour and in the period following the birth. Some women would not have another baby due to their childbirth experiences.-
dc.description.abstractThe context within which women give birth in the Republic of Ireland is important to their birth experiences. Although positive experiences were reported many women felt anxious and isolated. Busy environments added to women's fears and participants appeared to accept the lack of support as inevitable. Midwives play a pivotal role in helping women achieve a positive birth experience.-
dc.description.abstractExcluding women's views from service evaluation renders an incomplete and somewhat distorted depiction of childbirth in Ireland. Although women appear to be satisfied with a live healthy baby, the process of 'getting there' has an emotional and psychological dimension that is important to the experience. Measuring the quality of maternity services must encompass recognition of psychological and emotional well-being alongside physical safety.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Midwiferyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnecdotes as Topic-
dc.subject.meshContinuity of Patient Care-
dc.subject.meshDelivery, Obstetric-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Research-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInterpersonal Relations-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMaternal Health Services-
dc.subject.meshMothers-
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Care-
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction-
dc.subject.meshPilot Projects-
dc.subject.meshPostnatal Care-
dc.subject.meshPostpartum Period-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshProfessional-Patient Relations-
dc.subject.meshSocial Support-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.title'Not enough people to look after you': an exploration of women's experiences of childbirth in the Republic of Ireland.en_GB
dc.typePreprinten
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Health and Science, Scoil na Sláinte agus na hEolaíochta, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Dundalk, Co., Louth, Ireland. patricia.larkin@dkit.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalMidwiferyen_GB
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