IVF for premature ovarian failure: first reported births using oocytes donated from a twin sister

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/226252
Title:
IVF for premature ovarian failure: first reported births using oocytes donated from a twin sister
Authors:
Sills, Eric Scott; Brady, Adam C; Omar, Ahmed B; Walsh, David J; Salma, Umme; Walsh, Anthony PH
Citation:
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology. 2010 Mar 25;8(1):31
Issue Date:
25-Mar-2010
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1477-7827-8-31; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/226252
Abstract:
Abstract Background Premature ovarian failure (POF) remains a clinically challenging entity because in vitro fertilisation (IVF) with donor oocytes is currently the only treatment known to be effective. Methods A 33 year-old nulligravid patient with a normal karyotype was diagnosed with POF; she had a history of failed fertility treatments and had an elevated serum FSH (42 mIU/ml). Oocytes donated by her dizygotic twin sister were used for IVF. The donor had already completed a successful pregnancy herself and subsequently produced a total of 10 oocytes after a combined FSH/LH superovulation regime. These eggs were fertilised with sperm from the recipient's husband via intracytoplasmic injection and two fresh embryos were transferred to the recipient on day three. Results A healthy twin pregnancy resulted from IVF; two boys were delivered by caesarean section at 39 weeks' gestation. Additionally, four embryos were cryopreserved for the recipient's future use. The sister-donor achieved another natural pregnancy six months after oocyte retrieval, resulting in a healthy singleton delivery. Conclusion POF is believed to affect approximately 1% of reproductive age females, and POF patients with a sister who can be an oocyte donor for IVF are rare. Most such IVF patients will conceive from treatment using oocytes from an anonymous oocyte donor. This is the first report of births following sister-donor oocyte IVF in Ireland. Indeed, while sister-donor IVF has been successfully undertaken by IVF units elsewhere, this is the only known case where oocyte donation involved twin sisters. As with all types of donor gamete therapy, pre-treatment counselling is important in the circumstance of sister oocyte donation.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSills, Eric Scotten_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Adam Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOmar, Ahmed Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, David Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSalma, Ummeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Anthony PHen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-28T13:38:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-28T13:38:49Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-25-
dc.identifier.citationReproductive Biology and Endocrinology. 2010 Mar 25;8(1):31en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1477-7827-8-31-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/226252-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Premature ovarian failure (POF) remains a clinically challenging entity because in vitro fertilisation (IVF) with donor oocytes is currently the only treatment known to be effective. Methods A 33 year-old nulligravid patient with a normal karyotype was diagnosed with POF; she had a history of failed fertility treatments and had an elevated serum FSH (42 mIU/ml). Oocytes donated by her dizygotic twin sister were used for IVF. The donor had already completed a successful pregnancy herself and subsequently produced a total of 10 oocytes after a combined FSH/LH superovulation regime. These eggs were fertilised with sperm from the recipient's husband via intracytoplasmic injection and two fresh embryos were transferred to the recipient on day three. Results A healthy twin pregnancy resulted from IVF; two boys were delivered by caesarean section at 39 weeks' gestation. Additionally, four embryos were cryopreserved for the recipient's future use. The sister-donor achieved another natural pregnancy six months after oocyte retrieval, resulting in a healthy singleton delivery. Conclusion POF is believed to affect approximately 1% of reproductive age females, and POF patients with a sister who can be an oocyte donor for IVF are rare. Most such IVF patients will conceive from treatment using oocytes from an anonymous oocyte donor. This is the first report of births following sister-donor oocyte IVF in Ireland. Indeed, while sister-donor IVF has been successfully undertaken by IVF units elsewhere, this is the only known case where oocyte donation involved twin sisters. As with all types of donor gamete therapy, pre-treatment counselling is important in the circumstance of sister oocyte donation.-
dc.titleIVF for premature ovarian failure: first reported births using oocytes donated from a twin sisteren_GB
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderSills et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2012-05-25T19:04:35Z-
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