A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/223261
Title:
A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.
Authors:
Reygan, Finn C G; D'Alton, Paul
Affiliation:
Department of Psycho-oncology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin 4, Ireland. finncgreygan@yahoo.com.
Citation:
A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland. 2012:notPsychooncology
Journal:
Psycho-oncology
Issue Date:
9-May-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/223261
DOI:
10.1002/pon.3103
PubMed ID:
22573471
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1099-1611

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorReygan, Finn C Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorD'Alton, Paulen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-11T13:41:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-11T13:41:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-05-09-
dc.identifier.citationA pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland. 2012:notPsychooncologyen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1099-1611-
dc.identifier.pmid22573471-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.3103-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/223261-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psycho-oncologyen_GB
dc.titleA pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psycho-oncology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin 4, Ireland. finncgreygan@yahoo.com.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalPsycho-oncologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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