Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported sources of knowledge for practice.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/223257
Title:
Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported sources of knowledge for practice.
Authors:
Yadav, B L; Fealy, G M
Affiliation:
The National Forensic Mental Health Services, Central Mental Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. babu.yadav@hse.ie
Citation:
Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported sources of knowledge for practice. 2012, 19 (1):40-6 J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs
Journal:
Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursing
Issue Date:
Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/223257
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2850.2011.01751.x
PubMed ID:
22070347
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2850.2011.01751.x/abstract;jsessionid=9B8A92A59104EE234576BF850D54984A.d04t01
Abstract:
Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an approach to health care in which health professionals use the best evidence available to guide their clinical decisions and practice. Evidence is drawn from a range of sources, including published research, educational content and practical experience. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the sources of knowledge or evidence for practice used by psychiatric nurses in Ireland. The paper is part of a larger study, which also investigated barriers, facilitators and level of skills in achieving EBP among Irish psychiatric nurses. Data were collected in a postal survey of a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. The findings revealed that the majority of survey respondents based their practice on information which was derived from interactions with patients, from their personal experience and from information shared by colleagues and members of the multidisciplinary team, in preference to published sources of empirically derived evidence. These findings are consistent with those of the previous similar studies among general nurses and suggest that Irish psychiatric nurses face similar challenges to their general nursing counterparts in attaining of EBP.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Clinical Competence; Cross-Sectional Studies; Evidence-Based Medicine; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Surveys; Humans; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Psychiatric Nursing; Questionnaires; Self Report; Sex Factors
ISSN:
1365-2850

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYadav, B Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorFealy, G Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-11T13:16:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-11T13:16:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-
dc.identifier.citationIrish psychiatric nurses' self-reported sources of knowledge for practice. 2012, 19 (1):40-6 J Psychiatr Ment Health Nursen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-2850-
dc.identifier.pmid22070347-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2850.2011.01751.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/223257-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based practice (EBP) is an approach to health care in which health professionals use the best evidence available to guide their clinical decisions and practice. Evidence is drawn from a range of sources, including published research, educational content and practical experience. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the sources of knowledge or evidence for practice used by psychiatric nurses in Ireland. The paper is part of a larger study, which also investigated barriers, facilitators and level of skills in achieving EBP among Irish psychiatric nurses. Data were collected in a postal survey of a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. The findings revealed that the majority of survey respondents based their practice on information which was derived from interactions with patients, from their personal experience and from information shared by colleagues and members of the multidisciplinary team, in preference to published sources of empirically derived evidence. These findings are consistent with those of the previous similar studies among general nurses and suggest that Irish psychiatric nurses face similar challenges to their general nursing counterparts in attaining of EBP.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2850.2011.01751.x/abstract;jsessionid=9B8A92A59104EE234576BF850D54984A.d04t01en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursingen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshEvidence-Based Medicine-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice-
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Nursing-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshSelf Report-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.titleIrish psychiatric nurses' self-reported sources of knowledge for practice.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe National Forensic Mental Health Services, Central Mental Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. babu.yadav@hse.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of psychiatric and mental health nursingen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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