Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221839
Title:
Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.
Authors:
MacCarthy, Denise; Flint, Stephen R; Healy, Claire; Stassen, Leo F A
Affiliation:
Dublin Dental University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin. dmaccarthy@dental.tcd.ie
Citation:
Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide., 57 (4):195-9 J Ir Dent Assoc
Journal:
Journal of the Irish Dental Association
Issue Date:
Aug-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221839
PubMed ID:
21922994
Abstract:
Cancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of 'field cancerisation'/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Comprehensive Dental Care; Early Detection of Cancer; Gingiva; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Humans; Lip; Lymph Nodes; Lymphatic Metastasis; Mouth Floor; Mouth Mucosa; Mouth Neoplasms; Neck; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Staging; Palate; Physical Examination; Precancerous Conditions; Survival Rate; Tongue
ISSN:
0021-1133

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMacCarthy, Deniseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlint, Stephen Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Claireen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStassen, Leo F Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-03T10:47:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-03T10:47:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-08-
dc.identifier.citationOral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide., 57 (4):195-9 J Ir Dent Assocen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1133-
dc.identifier.pmid21922994-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/221839-
dc.description.abstractCancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of 'field cancerisation'/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of the Irish Dental Associationen_GB
dc.subject.meshComprehensive Dental Care-
dc.subject.meshEarly Detection of Cancer-
dc.subject.meshGingiva-
dc.subject.meshHead and Neck Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLip-
dc.subject.meshLymph Nodes-
dc.subject.meshLymphatic Metastasis-
dc.subject.meshMouth Floor-
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosa-
dc.subject.meshMouth Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNeck-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Metastasis-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging-
dc.subject.meshPalate-
dc.subject.meshPhysical Examination-
dc.subject.meshPrecancerous Conditions-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate-
dc.subject.meshTongue-
dc.titleOral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDublin Dental University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin. dmaccarthy@dental.tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Irish Dental Associationen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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