HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221832
Title:
HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.
Authors:
Duncan, H F; Smith, A J; Fleming, G J P; Cooper, P R
Affiliation:
Division of Restorative Dentistry & Periodontology, Dublin Dental University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2, Ireland.
Citation:
HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry. 2011, 90 (12):1377-88 J. Dent. Res.
Journal:
Journal of dental research
Issue Date:
Dec-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221832
DOI:
10.1177/0022034511406919
PubMed ID:
21536971
Abstract:
Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be 'tipped' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between 'normal' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Acetylation; Animals; Apoptosis; Calcification, Physiologic; Cell Cycle Checkpoints; Cell Differentiation; Cell Proliferation; Dental Pulp; Dentin, Secondary; Gene Expression; Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors; Humans; Inflammation; NF-kappa B; Neovascularization, Physiologic; Neurogenesis; Reactive Oxygen Species; Regeneration; Stem Cells
ISSN:
1544-0591

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, H Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, A Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFleming, G J Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooper, P Ren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-03T09:20:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-03T09:20:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-
dc.identifier.citationHDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry. 2011, 90 (12):1377-88 J. Dent. Res.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1544-0591-
dc.identifier.pmid21536971-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0022034511406919-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/221832-
dc.description.abstractAcetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be 'tipped' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between 'normal' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of dental researchen_GB
dc.subject.meshAcetylation-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshApoptosis-
dc.subject.meshCalcification, Physiologic-
dc.subject.meshCell Cycle Checkpoints-
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiation-
dc.subject.meshCell Proliferation-
dc.subject.meshDental Pulp-
dc.subject.meshDentin, Secondary-
dc.subject.meshGene Expression-
dc.subject.meshHistone Deacetylase Inhibitors-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInflammation-
dc.subject.meshNF-kappa B-
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Physiologic-
dc.subject.meshNeurogenesis-
dc.subject.meshReactive Oxygen Species-
dc.subject.meshRegeneration-
dc.subject.meshStem Cells-
dc.titleHDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Restorative Dentistry & Periodontology, Dublin Dental University Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of dental researchen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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