Agrammatism in a case of formal thought disorder: Beyond intellectual decline and working memory deficit.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221224
Title:
Agrammatism in a case of formal thought disorder: Beyond intellectual decline and working memory deficit.
Authors:
Semkovska, Maria
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry TCD, St. Patrick's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. semkovsm@tcd.ie
Citation:
Agrammatism in a case of formal thought disorder: Beyond intellectual decline and working memory deficit. 2010, 16 (1):37-49 Neurocase
Journal:
Neurocase
Issue Date:
Feb-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221224
DOI:
10.1080/13554790903193208
PubMed ID:
20391185
Abstract:
Previous studies have suggested that naming and syntactic deficits in formal thought disorder may be related to global cognitive decline. This article reports the case of a patient, FM, with formal thought disorder schizophrenia who presents disproportionate deficits in receptive and expressive grammar with respect to his intellectual level of functioning. Syntactic and morphologic components of expressive grammar appeared equally impaired. Deficits in language comprehension were observed independently from working memory limitations. FM showed preserved grammaticality judgment, but defective sentence comprehension where semantic context does not provide heuristics for assigning thematic roles, but syntactic knowledge is essential. These atypical results are discussed within a neurodevelopmental aetiological model of formal thought disorder.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Aphasia, Broca; Cognition Disorders; Humans; Language Tests; Male; Memory Disorders; Memory, Short-Term; Neuropsychological Tests; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Semantics; Thinking
ISSN:
1465-3656

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSemkovska, Mariaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-30T15:59:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-30T15:59:12Z-
dc.date.issued2010-02-
dc.identifier.citationAgrammatism in a case of formal thought disorder: Beyond intellectual decline and working memory deficit. 2010, 16 (1):37-49 Neurocaseen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1465-3656-
dc.identifier.pmid20391185-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13554790903193208-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/221224-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies have suggested that naming and syntactic deficits in formal thought disorder may be related to global cognitive decline. This article reports the case of a patient, FM, with formal thought disorder schizophrenia who presents disproportionate deficits in receptive and expressive grammar with respect to his intellectual level of functioning. Syntactic and morphologic components of expressive grammar appeared equally impaired. Deficits in language comprehension were observed independently from working memory limitations. FM showed preserved grammaticality judgment, but defective sentence comprehension where semantic context does not provide heuristics for assigning thematic roles, but syntactic knowledge is essential. These atypical results are discussed within a neurodevelopmental aetiological model of formal thought disorder.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Neurocaseen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAphasia, Broca-
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLanguage Tests-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMemory Disorders-
dc.subject.meshMemory, Short-Term-
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Tests-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales-
dc.subject.meshSemantics-
dc.subject.meshThinking-
dc.titleAgrammatism in a case of formal thought disorder: Beyond intellectual decline and working memory deficit.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry TCD, St. Patrick's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. semkovsm@tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalNeurocaseen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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