Living in critical times: The impact of critical incidents on frontline ambulance personnel--a qualitative perspective.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221100
Title:
Living in critical times: The impact of critical incidents on frontline ambulance personnel--a qualitative perspective.
Authors:
Gallagher, Sharon; McGilloway, Sinéd
Affiliation:
Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Council, Naas, Ireland. sharon.gallagher@nuim.ie
Citation:
Living in critical times: The impact of critical incidents on frontline ambulance personnel--a qualitative perspective. 2007, 9 (3):215-23 Int J Emerg Ment Health
Journal:
International journal of emergency mental health
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221100
PubMed ID:
18372663
Abstract:
Little is known about the impact of Critical Incidents (CIs) on the lives of ambulance personnel. One-to-one interviews were conducted with 27 participants who had experienced CIs during the previous 12 months in order to: assess the nature and impact of CIs on health and well-being; examine attitudes toward support services; and explore barriers to service use. The results showed that incidents involving children, suicides, and grotesque mutilation were the most distressing. Participants reported a wide range of physical and mental health problems including sleep difficulties, angry outbursts, irrationality and feelings of alienation. Key themes included: low support service uptake due to fears relating to confidentiality and machismo; a perceived lack of concern and support from management; and a need for professional counselling and stress awareness training. Emergency Medical Controllers (EMCs) also reported a number of difficulties unique to their role. The findings suggest that exposure to CIs has a significant impact on health and well-being; this has important implications for recognizing and appropriately addressing the health and training needs of ambulance personnel, including the effective management of Critical Incident Stress.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Crisis Intervention; Emergency Medical Technicians; Health Status; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Occupational Diseases; Quality of Life; Relief Work; Social Support; Stress Disorders, Traumatic
ISSN:
1522-4821

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Sharonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGilloway, Sinéden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-30T10:21:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-30T10:21:41Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationLiving in critical times: The impact of critical incidents on frontline ambulance personnel--a qualitative perspective. 2007, 9 (3):215-23 Int J Emerg Ment Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1522-4821-
dc.identifier.pmid18372663-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/221100-
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about the impact of Critical Incidents (CIs) on the lives of ambulance personnel. One-to-one interviews were conducted with 27 participants who had experienced CIs during the previous 12 months in order to: assess the nature and impact of CIs on health and well-being; examine attitudes toward support services; and explore barriers to service use. The results showed that incidents involving children, suicides, and grotesque mutilation were the most distressing. Participants reported a wide range of physical and mental health problems including sleep difficulties, angry outbursts, irrationality and feelings of alienation. Key themes included: low support service uptake due to fears relating to confidentiality and machismo; a perceived lack of concern and support from management; and a need for professional counselling and stress awareness training. Emergency Medical Controllers (EMCs) also reported a number of difficulties unique to their role. The findings suggest that exposure to CIs has a significant impact on health and well-being; this has important implications for recognizing and appropriately addressing the health and training needs of ambulance personnel, including the effective management of Critical Incident Stress.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of emergency mental healthen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCrisis Intervention-
dc.subject.meshEmergency Medical Technicians-
dc.subject.meshHealth Status-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Diseases-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life-
dc.subject.meshRelief Work-
dc.subject.meshSocial Support-
dc.subject.meshStress Disorders, Traumatic-
dc.titleLiving in critical times: The impact of critical incidents on frontline ambulance personnel--a qualitative perspective.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPre-Hospital Emergency Care Council, Naas, Ireland. sharon.gallagher@nuim.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of emergency mental healthen_GB
All Items in Lenus,the Irish health repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.