Ergonomic intervention: its effect on working posture and musculoskeletal symptoms in female biomedical scientists.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221086
Title:
Ergonomic intervention: its effect on working posture and musculoskeletal symptoms in female biomedical scientists.
Authors:
Kilroy, N; Dockrell, S
Affiliation:
Physiotherapy Department, Tullamore General Hospital, Co. Offaly, Ireland.
Citation:
Ergonomic intervention: its effect on working posture and musculoskeletal symptoms in female biomedical scientists. 2000, 57 (3):199-206 Br. J. Biomed. Sci.
Journal:
British journal of biomedical science
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/221086
PubMed ID:
11050770
Abstract:
This study investigates the effect of ergonomic intervention on working posture and musculoskeletal symptoms in female biomedical scientists. The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMQ), body discomfort chart (BDC) and rapid upper-limb assessment (RULA) are the tools for assessment. The study was conducted in three phases: pre-intervention, intervention and post-intervention. Pre-intervention, 79% of subjects reported a three-month prevalence of symptoms, and these were reported more frequently by those working in haematology/transfusion. Analysis by RULA showed that the majority (59%) of postures had a grand score of four. A further 24% had scores of five or six. The highest frequency of poor postures was seen in haematology/transfusion. Intervention comprised physical workplace changes, a seminar, and advice on risk factors. In the post-intervention phase, baseline measurements were repeated. Reporting of three-month prevalence of symptoms had decreased to 54%, and reports of body discomfort also had decreased. The majority (64%) had a RULA grand score of three. No observed postures had scores of five or six. In conclusion, ergonomic intervention resulted in an improvement in working postures, and a decrease in the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and body discomfort. Analysis of findings indicate that RULA scores generally corresponded with reporting of symptoms (NMQ) and discomfort (BDC).
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Female; Human Engineering; Humans; Laboratories, Hospital; Middle Aged; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Occupational Diseases; Posture
ISSN:
0967-4845

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKilroy, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDockrell, Sen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-30T10:06:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-30T10:06:59Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.citationErgonomic intervention: its effect on working posture and musculoskeletal symptoms in female biomedical scientists. 2000, 57 (3):199-206 Br. J. Biomed. Sci.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0967-4845-
dc.identifier.pmid11050770-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/221086-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the effect of ergonomic intervention on working posture and musculoskeletal symptoms in female biomedical scientists. The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMQ), body discomfort chart (BDC) and rapid upper-limb assessment (RULA) are the tools for assessment. The study was conducted in three phases: pre-intervention, intervention and post-intervention. Pre-intervention, 79% of subjects reported a three-month prevalence of symptoms, and these were reported more frequently by those working in haematology/transfusion. Analysis by RULA showed that the majority (59%) of postures had a grand score of four. A further 24% had scores of five or six. The highest frequency of poor postures was seen in haematology/transfusion. Intervention comprised physical workplace changes, a seminar, and advice on risk factors. In the post-intervention phase, baseline measurements were repeated. Reporting of three-month prevalence of symptoms had decreased to 54%, and reports of body discomfort also had decreased. The majority (64%) had a RULA grand score of three. No observed postures had scores of five or six. In conclusion, ergonomic intervention resulted in an improvement in working postures, and a decrease in the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and body discomfort. Analysis of findings indicate that RULA scores generally corresponded with reporting of symptoms (NMQ) and discomfort (BDC).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British journal of biomedical scienceen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHuman Engineering-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLaboratories, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshMusculoskeletal Diseases-
dc.subject.meshOccupational Diseases-
dc.subject.meshPosture-
dc.titleErgonomic intervention: its effect on working posture and musculoskeletal symptoms in female biomedical scientists.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysiotherapy Department, Tullamore General Hospital, Co. Offaly, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of biomedical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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