An online management information system for objective structured clinical examinations

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/220911
Title:
An online management information system for objective structured clinical examinations
Authors:
Kropmans, Thomas JB; O’Donovan, Barry GG; Cunningham, David; Murphy, Andrew W; Flaherty, Gerard; Nestel, Debra; Dunne, Fidelma P
Affiliation:
Galway University Hospital
Citation:
Kropmans, T et al. An Online Management Information System for Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Computer and Information Science Vol 5, No 1 (2012)
Publisher:
Canadian Center of Science and Education
Journal:
Computer and Information Science
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/220911
DOI:
10.5539/cis.v5n1p38
Additional Links:
http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/cis/article/view/12427
Abstract:
Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) are adopted for high stakes assessment in medical education. Students pass through a series of timed stations demonstrating specific skills. Examiners observe and rate students using predetermined criteria. In most OSCEs low level technology is used to capture, analyse and produce results. We describe an OSCE Management Information System (OMIS) to streamline the OSCE process and improve quality assurance. OMIS captured OSCE data in real time using a Web 2.0 platform. We compared the traditional paper trail outcome with detailed real time analyses of separate stations. Using a paper trail version only one student failed the OSCE. However, OMIS identified nineteen possibly ‘incompetent’ students. Although there are limitations to the design of the study, the results are promising and likely to lead to defendable judgements on student performance.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) are adopted for high stakes assessment in medical education. Students pass through a series of timed stations demonstrating specific skills. Examiners observe and rate students using predetermined criteria. In most OSCEs low level technology is used to capture, analyse and produce results. We describe an OSCE Management Information System (OMIS) to streamline the OSCE process and improve quality assurance. OMIS captured OSCE data in real time using a Web 2.0 platform. We compared the traditional paper trail outcome with detailed real time analyses of separate stations. Using a paper trail version only one student failed the OSCE. However, OMIS identified nineteen possibly ‘incompetent’ students. Although there are limitations to the design of the study, the results are promising and likely to lead to defendable judgements on student performance.
Keywords:
EDUCATION; EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND SKILLS; TECHNOLOGY
Local subject classification:
CLINICAL EXAMINATIONS
ISSN:
1913-8997

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKropmans, Thomas JBen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Donovan, Barry GGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Andrew Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlaherty, Gerarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorNestel, Debraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Fidelma Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-27T08:51:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-27T08:51:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-01-
dc.identifier.citationKropmans, T et al. An Online Management Information System for Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Computer and Information Science Vol 5, No 1 (2012)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1913-8997-
dc.identifier.doi10.5539/cis.v5n1p38-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/220911-
dc.descriptionObjective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) are adopted for high stakes assessment in medical education. Students pass through a series of timed stations demonstrating specific skills. Examiners observe and rate students using predetermined criteria. In most OSCEs low level technology is used to capture, analyse and produce results. We describe an OSCE Management Information System (OMIS) to streamline the OSCE process and improve quality assurance. OMIS captured OSCE data in real time using a Web 2.0 platform. We compared the traditional paper trail outcome with detailed real time analyses of separate stations. Using a paper trail version only one student failed the OSCE. However, OMIS identified nineteen possibly ‘incompetent’ students. Although there are limitations to the design of the study, the results are promising and likely to lead to defendable judgements on student performance.en_GB
dc.description.abstractObjective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) are adopted for high stakes assessment in medical education. Students pass through a series of timed stations demonstrating specific skills. Examiners observe and rate students using predetermined criteria. In most OSCEs low level technology is used to capture, analyse and produce results. We describe an OSCE Management Information System (OMIS) to streamline the OSCE process and improve quality assurance. OMIS captured OSCE data in real time using a Web 2.0 platform. We compared the traditional paper trail outcome with detailed real time analyses of separate stations. Using a paper trail version only one student failed the OSCE. However, OMIS identified nineteen possibly ‘incompetent’ students. Although there are limitations to the design of the study, the results are promising and likely to lead to defendable judgements on student performance.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCanadian Center of Science and Educationen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/cis/article/view/12427en_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND SKILLSen_GB
dc.subjectTECHNOLOGYen_GB
dc.subject.otherCLINICAL EXAMINATIONSen_GB
dc.titleAn online management information system for objective structured clinical examinationsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGalway University Hospitalen_GB
dc.identifier.journalComputer and Information Scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceConnachten
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