Dyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/220783
Title:
Dyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk.
Authors:
Tomkin, Gerald H
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin and Diabetes Institute of Ireland, Beacon Hospital, Sandyford, Clontra, Quinns Road, Shankill Co, Dublin, Ireland. gerald.tomkin@tcd.ie, tomking@tcd.ie
Citation:
Dyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk. 2010, 11 (1):5-9 Atheroscler Suppl
Journal:
Atherosclerosis. Supplements
Issue Date:
Jun-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/220783
DOI:
10.1016/j.atherosclerosissup.2010.03.005
PubMed ID:
20434963
Abstract:
Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated with the majority of de novo cholesterol synthesis occurring in the liver and intestine. 3 Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a major enzyme involved in cholesterol synthesis, is raised in both liver and intestine in diabetic animals. Niemann PickC1-like1 protein regulates cholesterol absorption in the intestine and facilitates cholesterol transport through the liver. There is evidence to suggest that the effect of inhibition of Niemann PickC1-like1 lowers cholesterol through its effect not only in the intestine but also in the liver. ATP binding cassette proteins G5/G8 regulate cholesterol re-excretion in the intestine and in the liver, cholesterol excretion into the bile. Diabetes is associated with reduced ATP binding cassette protein G5/G8 expression in both the liver and intestine in animal models. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is central to the formation of the chylomicron in the intestine and VLDL in the liver. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein mRNA is increased in diabetes in both the intestine and liver. Cross-talk between the intestine and liver is poorly documented in humans due to the difficulty in obtaining liver biopsies but animal studies are fairly consistent in showing relationships that explain in part mechanisms involved in cholesterol homeostasis.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters; Animals; Biological Transport; Carrier Proteins; Cholesterol; Chylomicrons; Diabetes Mellitus; Dyslipidemias; Homeostasis; Humans; Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases; Intestines; Liver; Membrane Proteins
ISSN:
1878-5050

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTomkin, Gerald Hen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-26T11:40:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-26T11:40:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010-06-
dc.identifier.citationDyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk. 2010, 11 (1):5-9 Atheroscler Supplen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1878-5050-
dc.identifier.pmid20434963-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atherosclerosissup.2010.03.005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/220783-
dc.description.abstractCholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated with the majority of de novo cholesterol synthesis occurring in the liver and intestine. 3 Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a major enzyme involved in cholesterol synthesis, is raised in both liver and intestine in diabetic animals. Niemann PickC1-like1 protein regulates cholesterol absorption in the intestine and facilitates cholesterol transport through the liver. There is evidence to suggest that the effect of inhibition of Niemann PickC1-like1 lowers cholesterol through its effect not only in the intestine but also in the liver. ATP binding cassette proteins G5/G8 regulate cholesterol re-excretion in the intestine and in the liver, cholesterol excretion into the bile. Diabetes is associated with reduced ATP binding cassette protein G5/G8 expression in both the liver and intestine in animal models. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is central to the formation of the chylomicron in the intestine and VLDL in the liver. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein mRNA is increased in diabetes in both the intestine and liver. Cross-talk between the intestine and liver is poorly documented in humans due to the difficulty in obtaining liver biopsies but animal studies are fairly consistent in showing relationships that explain in part mechanisms involved in cholesterol homeostasis.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Atherosclerosis. Supplementsen_GB
dc.subject.meshATP-Binding Cassette Transporters-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBiological Transport-
dc.subject.meshCarrier Proteins-
dc.subject.meshCholesterol-
dc.subject.meshChylomicrons-
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus-
dc.subject.meshDyslipidemias-
dc.subject.meshHomeostasis-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases-
dc.subject.meshIntestines-
dc.subject.meshLiver-
dc.subject.meshMembrane Proteins-
dc.titleDyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTrinity College Dublin and Diabetes Institute of Ireland, Beacon Hospital, Sandyford, Clontra, Quinns Road, Shankill Co, Dublin, Ireland. gerald.tomkin@tcd.ie, tomking@tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalAtherosclerosis. Supplementsen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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