Multiple disadvantage in Ireland an equality analysis of Census 2006

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/220532
Title:
Multiple disadvantage in Ireland an equality analysis of Census 2006
Authors:
Watson, Dorothy; Lunn, Pete; Quinn, Emma; Russell, Helen
Affiliation:
Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)
Publisher:
The Equality Authority
Issue Date:
Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/220532
Additional Links:
http://www.equality.ie/research and www.esri.ie
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The goal of this report is to examine the risk of disadvantage associated with the nine grounds on the basis of which unequal treatment is prohibited under the Equality Acts: gender, marital status, family status, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, race and membership of the Traveller community. This comprehensive analysis is made possible by access to the full Census 2006 Research Micro-data File. For the first time in Ireland, we are able to examine the consequences of group membership across all of these categories in a single study. Unlike most national surveys, there are enough members of small groups such as Travellers, other ethnic minorities and religious minorities to compare their situations with those of more advantaged groups. Also, unlike most national surveys, which must be concerned with issues of coverage and response, the census coverage of different groups in the population is as complete as it can be. Finally, we were able to investigate whether membership of two disadvantaged groups (e.g. being a woman and having a disability) will always result in significantly worse outcomes. Our analysis in this area shows that this need not always be the case. This highlights the need to consider the processes of disadvantage (such as the operation of the educational system, labour market, family roles, migration and life cycle patterns) and the way these may interact to result in different outcomes. We examine five different areas of disadvantage: low levels of education, being outside the labour market, unemployment, lower manual social class and lack of access to a car. The report provides figures on the overall or ‘gross’ differences in disadvantage between the groups and on the ‘net’ disadvantage that remains after taking account of membership of any of the other groups as well as migration experience, urban/rural location and region. The focus is on adults of working age (25 to 64 years) and we distinguish throughout between two broad age groups: 25– 44, where family formation is concentrated, and 45–64. In the first two chapters of the report we describe the conceptual background to the study, emphasising the importance of understanding processes of disadvantage, and the data used for the analysis.
Keywords:
SOCIAL EXCLUSION; INEQUALITY
ISBN:
978-1-908275-36-3

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Dorothyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLunn, Peteen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Emmaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Helenen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-25T14:02:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-25T14:02:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-908275-36-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/220532-
dc.descriptionThe goal of this report is to examine the risk of disadvantage associated with the nine grounds on the basis of which unequal treatment is prohibited under the Equality Acts: gender, marital status, family status, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, race and membership of the Traveller community. This comprehensive analysis is made possible by access to the full Census 2006 Research Micro-data File. For the first time in Ireland, we are able to examine the consequences of group membership across all of these categories in a single study. Unlike most national surveys, there are enough members of small groups such as Travellers, other ethnic minorities and religious minorities to compare their situations with those of more advantaged groups. Also, unlike most national surveys, which must be concerned with issues of coverage and response, the census coverage of different groups in the population is as complete as it can be. Finally, we were able to investigate whether membership of two disadvantaged groups (e.g. being a woman and having a disability) will always result in significantly worse outcomes. Our analysis in this area shows that this need not always be the case. This highlights the need to consider the processes of disadvantage (such as the operation of the educational system, labour market, family roles, migration and life cycle patterns) and the way these may interact to result in different outcomes. We examine five different areas of disadvantage: low levels of education, being outside the labour market, unemployment, lower manual social class and lack of access to a car. The report provides figures on the overall or ‘gross’ differences in disadvantage between the groups and on the ‘net’ disadvantage that remains after taking account of membership of any of the other groups as well as migration experience, urban/rural location and region. The focus is on adults of working age (25 to 64 years) and we distinguish throughout between two broad age groups: 25– 44, where family formation is concentrated, and 45–64. In the first two chapters of the report we describe the conceptual background to the study, emphasising the importance of understanding processes of disadvantage, and the data used for the analysis.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Equality Authorityen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.equality.ie/research and www.esri.ieen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL EXCLUSIONen_GB
dc.subjectINEQUALITYen_GB
dc.titleMultiple disadvantage in Ireland an equality analysis of Census 2006en_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentEconomic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)en_GB
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