Parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/220495
Title:
Parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants in the United Kingdom and Ireland.
Authors:
Hopewell, J; Miletin, J
Affiliation:
Department of Neonatology, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dolphin's Barn, Dublin 8.
Citation:
Parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants in the United Kingdom and Ireland. 2012, 105 (2):42-5 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/220495
PubMed ID:
22455237
Abstract:
Parenteral nutrition (PN) plays an important role in providing nutrients for infants unable to tolerate enteral feeds study was to look at PN prescribing in neonatal units in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Ireland, in particular in infants < 1.5 kg. A postal questionnaire was administered to the 235 neonatal units. The response rate was 179 (76%), of which 136 (76%) used PN. The initial amount of protein prescribed was 0.1-2 g/kg/day in 102 units (91%), >2 g/kg/day in 4 (4%) and 5 (5%) used no protein. 88 (80%) started lipids with the first PN prescription. Only 5 units (5%) started with >1 g/kg/day. The maximum dose of lipids and protein both varied from 2 - >4 g/kg/day. The initial glucose infusion rate was 4-8 mg/kg/min. Interestingly only 44% of units started PN in the first 24 hours of age. Hence results show great variation in PN prescribing.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Parenteral nutrition (PN) plays an important role in providing nutrients for infants unable to tolerate enteral feeds study was to look at PN prescribing in neonatal units in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Ireland, in particular in infants < 1.5 kg. A postal questionnaire was administered to the 235 neonatal units. The response rate was 179 (76%), of which 136 (76%) used PN. The initial amount of protein prescribed was 0.1-2 g/kg/day in 102 units (91%), >2 g/kg/day in 4 (4%) and 5 (5%) used no protein. 88 (80%) started lipids with the first PN prescription. Only 5 units (5%) started with >1 g/kg/day. The maximum dose of lipids and protein both varied from 2 - >4 g/kg/day. The initial glucose infusion rate was 4-8 mg/kg/min. Interestingly only 44% of units started PN in the first 24 hours of age. Hence results show great variation in PN prescribing.
MeSH:
Amino Acids; Great Britain; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Infant, Very Low Birth Weight; Ireland; Parenteral Nutrition
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHopewell, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiletin, Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-25T09:22:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-25T09:22:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-
dc.identifier.citationParenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants in the United Kingdom and Ireland. 2012, 105 (2):42-5 Ir Med Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid22455237-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/220495-
dc.descriptionParenteral nutrition (PN) plays an important role in providing nutrients for infants unable to tolerate enteral feeds study was to look at PN prescribing in neonatal units in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Ireland, in particular in infants < 1.5 kg. A postal questionnaire was administered to the 235 neonatal units. The response rate was 179 (76%), of which 136 (76%) used PN. The initial amount of protein prescribed was 0.1-2 g/kg/day in 102 units (91%), >2 g/kg/day in 4 (4%) and 5 (5%) used no protein. 88 (80%) started lipids with the first PN prescription. Only 5 units (5%) started with >1 g/kg/day. The maximum dose of lipids and protein both varied from 2 - >4 g/kg/day. The initial glucose infusion rate was 4-8 mg/kg/min. Interestingly only 44% of units started PN in the first 24 hours of age. Hence results show great variation in PN prescribing.en_GB
dc.description.abstractParenteral nutrition (PN) plays an important role in providing nutrients for infants unable to tolerate enteral feeds study was to look at PN prescribing in neonatal units in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Ireland, in particular in infants < 1.5 kg. A postal questionnaire was administered to the 235 neonatal units. The response rate was 179 (76%), of which 136 (76%) used PN. The initial amount of protein prescribed was 0.1-2 g/kg/day in 102 units (91%), >2 g/kg/day in 4 (4%) and 5 (5%) used no protein. 88 (80%) started lipids with the first PN prescription. Only 5 units (5%) started with >1 g/kg/day. The maximum dose of lipids and protein both varied from 2 - >4 g/kg/day. The initial glucose infusion rate was 4-8 mg/kg/min. Interestingly only 44% of units started PN in the first 24 hours of age. Hence results show great variation in PN prescribing.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.subject.meshAmino Acids-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Very Low Birth Weight-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshParenteral Nutrition-
dc.titleParenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants in the United Kingdom and Ireland.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neonatology, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dolphin's Barn, Dublin 8.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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