Cancer-Related Fatigue in Women With Breast Cancer: Outcomes of a 5-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/219673
Title:
Cancer-Related Fatigue in Women With Breast Cancer: Outcomes of a 5-Year Prospective Cohort Study.
Authors:
Goldstein, David; Bennett, Barbara K; Webber, Kate; Boyle, Fran; de Souza, Paul L; Wilcken, Nicholas R C; Scott, Elizabeth M; Toppler, Ruth; Murie, Penelope; O'Malley, Linda; McCourt, Junie; Friedlander, Michael; Hickie, Ian B; Lloyd, Andrew R
Affiliation:
David Goldstein, Barbara K. Bennett, Kate Webber, and Michael Friedlander, Prince of Wales Hospital; Fran Boyle and Ruth Toppler, The Mater Hospital; Paul L. de Souza and Linda O'Malley, St George Hospital; Nicholas R.C. Wilcken and Penelope Murie, Westmead Hospital; Nicholas R.C. Wilcken and Junie McCourt, Nepean Hospital; Fran Boyle, Nicholas R.C. Wilcken, Elizabeth M. Scott, and Ian B. Hickie, University of Sydney; David Goldstein, Barbara K. Bennett, Kate Webber, Michael Friedlander, and Andrew R. Lloyd, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Citation:
Cancer-Related Fatigue in Women With Breast Cancer: Outcomes of a 5-Year Prospective Cohort Study. 2012:notJ Clin Oncol
Journal:
Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Issue Date:
16-Apr-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/219673
DOI:
10.1200/JCO.2011.34.6148
PubMed ID:
22508807
Abstract:
PURPOSEProlonged and disabling fatigue is prevalent after cancer treatment, but the early natural history of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has not been systematically examined to document consistent presence of symptoms. Hence, relationships to cancer, surgery, and adjuvant therapy are unclear. PATIENTS AND METHODSA prospective cohort study of women receiving adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer was conducted. Women (n = 218) were enrolled after surgery and observed at end treatment and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months as well as 5 years. Structured interviews and self-report questionnaires were used to record physical and psychologic health as well as disability and health care utilization. Patients with CRF persisting for 6 months were assessed to exclude alternative medical and psychiatric causes of fatigue. Predictors of persistent fatigue, mood disturbance, and health care utilization were sought by logistic regression.ResultsThe case rate for CRF was 24% (n = 51) postsurgery and 31% (n = 69) at end of treatment; it became persistent in 11% (n = 24) at 6 months and 6% (n = 12) at 12 months. At each time point, approximately one third of the patients had comorbid mood disturbance. Persistent CRF was predicted by tumor size but not demographic, psychologic, surgical, or hematologic parameters. CRF was associated with significant disability and health care utilization. CONCLUSIONCRF is common but generally runs a self-limiting course. Much of the previously reported high rates of persistent CRF may be attributable to factors unrelated to the cancer or its treatment.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1527-7755

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Barbara Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorWebber, Kateen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Franen_GB
dc.contributor.authorde Souza, Paul Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilcken, Nicholas R Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorScott, Elizabeth Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorToppler, Ruthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurie, Penelopeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Malley, Lindaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCourt, Junieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFriedlander, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHickie, Ian Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Andrew Ren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-20T15:39:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-20T15:39:41Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-16-
dc.identifier.citationCancer-Related Fatigue in Women With Breast Cancer: Outcomes of a 5-Year Prospective Cohort Study. 2012:notJ Clin Oncolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1527-7755-
dc.identifier.pmid22508807-
dc.identifier.doi10.1200/JCO.2011.34.6148-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/219673-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSEProlonged and disabling fatigue is prevalent after cancer treatment, but the early natural history of cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has not been systematically examined to document consistent presence of symptoms. Hence, relationships to cancer, surgery, and adjuvant therapy are unclear. PATIENTS AND METHODSA prospective cohort study of women receiving adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer was conducted. Women (n = 218) were enrolled after surgery and observed at end treatment and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months as well as 5 years. Structured interviews and self-report questionnaires were used to record physical and psychologic health as well as disability and health care utilization. Patients with CRF persisting for 6 months were assessed to exclude alternative medical and psychiatric causes of fatigue. Predictors of persistent fatigue, mood disturbance, and health care utilization were sought by logistic regression.ResultsThe case rate for CRF was 24% (n = 51) postsurgery and 31% (n = 69) at end of treatment; it became persistent in 11% (n = 24) at 6 months and 6% (n = 12) at 12 months. At each time point, approximately one third of the patients had comorbid mood disturbance. Persistent CRF was predicted by tumor size but not demographic, psychologic, surgical, or hematologic parameters. CRF was associated with significant disability and health care utilization. CONCLUSIONCRF is common but generally runs a self-limiting course. Much of the previously reported high rates of persistent CRF may be attributable to factors unrelated to the cancer or its treatment.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncologyen_GB
dc.titleCancer-Related Fatigue in Women With Breast Cancer: Outcomes of a 5-Year Prospective Cohort Study.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDavid Goldstein, Barbara K. Bennett, Kate Webber, and Michael Friedlander, Prince of Wales Hospital; Fran Boyle and Ruth Toppler, The Mater Hospital; Paul L. de Souza and Linda O'Malley, St George Hospital; Nicholas R.C. Wilcken and Penelope Murie, Westmead Hospital; Nicholas R.C. Wilcken and Junie McCourt, Nepean Hospital; Fran Boyle, Nicholas R.C. Wilcken, Elizabeth M. Scott, and Ian B. Hickie, University of Sydney; David Goldstein, Barbara K. Bennett, Kate Webber, Michael Friedlander, and Andrew R. Lloyd, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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