Implementation of the reform of the intern year second interim report on the implementation of recommendations of the National Committee report on the intern year phase 2: July 2010 – July 2011

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/218911
Title:
Implementation of the reform of the intern year second interim report on the implementation of recommendations of the National Committee report on the intern year phase 2: July 2010 – July 2011
Authors:
Health Service Executive (HSE), Medical Education and Training Unit
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
Apr-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/218911
Additional Links:
http://www.hse.ie/eng/services/publications/corporate/etr/
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Internship in its current form has been in place in Ireland for decades with, until very recently, little reform or development. Intern training has developed from a predominantly “apprenticeship” model to being a structured, properly resourced training programme for medical graduates. There is no doubt that the implementation of the recommendations of the NCMET Report has greatly improved the structure of intern training, has brought a high level of transparency to the recruitment of interns and has allowed graduates to experience the realities of clinical practice in a wider range of specialties. Implementation of the reforms recommended in the report of the National Committee on Medical Training has continued, following the initial implementation phase in 2009/10. Principal among the reforms introduced during the second year of implementation included: • The formal establishment of the Mid-West Intern Training Network; • The establishment of an additional 30 intern training places; • The implementation of the National Intern Training Programme; • The introduction of the requirement for demonstration of English language proficiency. However, challenges remain. Key amongst these challenges are (i) graduate retention and (ii) the number of available intern posts. The HSE undertook a survey of the cohort of interns who completed internship in July 2011. While the response to the survey was low, at 44%, the feedback provided by interns is helpful in contributing to the ongoing development of intern training. A summary of the survey results is provided in Section 8 and the composite national results are included at Appendix C. The HSE undertook a tracking study of interns completing training in July 2011. It would appear that approximately half of this cohort are not currently working in the Irish health service. While this is understandably a matter of concern, particularly given the State’s considerable investment in medical education and training and the health service’s ongoing reliance on overseas medical recruitment, it is not unusual for Irish doctors to spend some time abroad after internship and most return home. It will be important to continue to monitor this situation to obtain a clear picture of the attrition rate from the Irish medical education and training pathway. By law, all medical graduates in Ireland must complete internship in order to practise medicine. There is a significant deficit in the number of intern posts available for the Government- funded expanded number of medical graduates. Investment in undergraduate medical education has not been matched by investment at intern level. The current deficit, if unchecked, will therefore result in a significant number of graduates of Irish medical schools being unable to practise medicine in Ireland. This would represent a waste of significant State resources, a missed opportunity to generate a domestically-trained medical workforce and would have serious implications for individual students and their medical schools.
Keywords:
HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT; MEDICAL STAFFING; EDUCATION; TRAINING

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE), Medical Education and Training Uniten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-18T08:30:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-18T08:30:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/218911-
dc.descriptionInternship in its current form has been in place in Ireland for decades with, until very recently, little reform or development. Intern training has developed from a predominantly “apprenticeship” model to being a structured, properly resourced training programme for medical graduates. There is no doubt that the implementation of the recommendations of the NCMET Report has greatly improved the structure of intern training, has brought a high level of transparency to the recruitment of interns and has allowed graduates to experience the realities of clinical practice in a wider range of specialties. Implementation of the reforms recommended in the report of the National Committee on Medical Training has continued, following the initial implementation phase in 2009/10. Principal among the reforms introduced during the second year of implementation included: • The formal establishment of the Mid-West Intern Training Network; • The establishment of an additional 30 intern training places; • The implementation of the National Intern Training Programme; • The introduction of the requirement for demonstration of English language proficiency. However, challenges remain. Key amongst these challenges are (i) graduate retention and (ii) the number of available intern posts. The HSE undertook a survey of the cohort of interns who completed internship in July 2011. While the response to the survey was low, at 44%, the feedback provided by interns is helpful in contributing to the ongoing development of intern training. A summary of the survey results is provided in Section 8 and the composite national results are included at Appendix C. The HSE undertook a tracking study of interns completing training in July 2011. It would appear that approximately half of this cohort are not currently working in the Irish health service. While this is understandably a matter of concern, particularly given the State’s considerable investment in medical education and training and the health service’s ongoing reliance on overseas medical recruitment, it is not unusual for Irish doctors to spend some time abroad after internship and most return home. It will be important to continue to monitor this situation to obtain a clear picture of the attrition rate from the Irish medical education and training pathway. By law, all medical graduates in Ireland must complete internship in order to practise medicine. There is a significant deficit in the number of intern posts available for the Government- funded expanded number of medical graduates. Investment in undergraduate medical education has not been matched by investment at intern level. The current deficit, if unchecked, will therefore result in a significant number of graduates of Irish medical schools being unable to practise medicine in Ireland. This would represent a waste of significant State resources, a missed opportunity to generate a domestically-trained medical workforce and would have serious implications for individual students and their medical schools.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hse.ie/eng/services/publications/corporate/etr/en_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.subjectMEDICAL STAFFINGen_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subjectTRAININGen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of the reform of the intern year second interim report on the implementation of recommendations of the National Committee report on the intern year phase 2: July 2010 – July 2011en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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