Recommendations for a national policy on vitamin d supplementation for infants in Ireland

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/218010
Title:
Recommendations for a national policy on vitamin d supplementation for infants in Ireland
Authors:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Publisher:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/218010
Additional Links:
http://www.fsai.ie/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=1222
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
At a time when nutrition-related diseases, caused mainly by excess, are on the increase in Ireland, it would seem reasonable to assume that the problem of nutritional deficiency should no longer be a serious public health issue. Yet, the recent re-emergence of rickets (a severe form of vitamin D deficiency causing deformity of the bones) amongst infants in Ireland, which was thought to be eradicated at the end of the last World War, clearly demonstrates that this is not the case. Vitamin D, which is involved in calcium metabolism and is necessary for good bone health, is primarily produced in the body via the action of sunlight on the skin. However, Ireland’s northerly latitude means that vitamin D production from sunlight is severely compromised and as vitamin D is found in only a limited number of foods, dietary intakes have little impact on overall vitamin D status. Indeed, apart from the cases of rickets that have been reported, there is much evidence that sub-optimal levels of vitamin D in Ireland are widespread. Other countries at latitudes similar to that of Ireland, e.g. Canada and the UK, have identified this problem and have long since adopted vitamin D supplementation and/or fortification policies to tackle vitamin D inadequacy. It is a matter of some urgency that Ireland joins these other countries and has in place a policy on vitamin D supplementation that is safe, unambiguous and easily implemented. Since the skeletal system is developing so rapidly in infancy, particularly in the first year of life, and rickets usually presents in early childhood, the recommendations for policy put forward by the Working Group on Vitamin D Supplementation for Infants in Ireland focus on infants aged 0-12 months.
Keywords:
FOOD SAFETY; NUTRITION; VITAMIN DEFICIENCY; VITAMIN SUPPLEMENT; VITAMIN
ISBN:
1904465471

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-10T11:45:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-10T11:45:43Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.isbn1904465471-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/218010-
dc.descriptionAt a time when nutrition-related diseases, caused mainly by excess, are on the increase in Ireland, it would seem reasonable to assume that the problem of nutritional deficiency should no longer be a serious public health issue. Yet, the recent re-emergence of rickets (a severe form of vitamin D deficiency causing deformity of the bones) amongst infants in Ireland, which was thought to be eradicated at the end of the last World War, clearly demonstrates that this is not the case. Vitamin D, which is involved in calcium metabolism and is necessary for good bone health, is primarily produced in the body via the action of sunlight on the skin. However, Ireland’s northerly latitude means that vitamin D production from sunlight is severely compromised and as vitamin D is found in only a limited number of foods, dietary intakes have little impact on overall vitamin D status. Indeed, apart from the cases of rickets that have been reported, there is much evidence that sub-optimal levels of vitamin D in Ireland are widespread. Other countries at latitudes similar to that of Ireland, e.g. Canada and the UK, have identified this problem and have long since adopted vitamin D supplementation and/or fortification policies to tackle vitamin D inadequacy. It is a matter of some urgency that Ireland joins these other countries and has in place a policy on vitamin D supplementation that is safe, unambiguous and easily implemented. Since the skeletal system is developing so rapidly in infancy, particularly in the first year of life, and rickets usually presents in early childhood, the recommendations for policy put forward by the Working Group on Vitamin D Supplementation for Infants in Ireland focus on infants aged 0-12 months.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.fsai.ie/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=1222en_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectNUTRITIONen_GB
dc.subjectVITAMIN DEFICIENCYen_GB
dc.subjectVITAMIN SUPPLEMENTen_GB
dc.subjectVITAMINen_GB
dc.titleRecommendations for a national policy on vitamin d supplementation for infants in Irelanden_GB
dc.typeReporten
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