A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/217196
Title:
A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia.
Authors:
Walsh, Jennifer; Mahony, Rhona; Foley, Michael; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Dublin National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie
Citation:
A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia. 2010, 10:16 BMC Pregnancy Childbirth
Journal:
BMC pregnancy and childbirth
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/217196
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2393-10-16
PubMed ID:
20416041
Abstract:
Maternal weight and maternal weight gain during pregnancy exert a significant influence on infant birth weight and the incidence of macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is associated with an increase in both adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome, and also confers a future risk of childhood obesity. Studies have shown that a low glycaemic diet is associated with lower birth weights, however these studies have been small and not randomised 12. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women, and maternal weight influences this recurrence risk 3.; We propose a randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet vs. no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of fetal macrosomia. Secundigravid women whose first baby was macrosomic, defined as a birth weight greater than 4000 g will be recruited at their first antenatal visit.Patients will be randomised into two arms, a control arm which will receive no dietary intervention and a diet arm which will be commenced on a low glycaemic index diet.The primary outcome measure will be the mean birth weight centiles and ponderal indices in each group.; Altering the source of maternal dietary carbohydrate may prove to be valuable in the management of pregnancies where there has been a history of fetal macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women. This randomised control trial will investigate whether or not a low glycaemic index diet can affect this recurrence risk.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Anthropometry; Birth Weight; Body Mass Index; Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted; Female; Fetal Macrosomia; Food Habits; Glycemic Index; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Ireland; Obesity; Parity; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications; Recurrence; Risk Factors; Ultrasonography, Prenatal; Weight Gain
ISSN:
1471-2393
Ethical Approval:
N/A

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Jennifer-
dc.contributor.authorMahony, Rhona-
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorMc Auliffe, Fionnuala-
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-30T14:01:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-30T14:01:36Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationA randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia. 2010, 10:16 BMC Pregnancy Childbirth-
dc.identifier.issn1471-2393-
dc.identifier.pmid20416041-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2393-10-16-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/217196-
dc.description.abstractMaternal weight and maternal weight gain during pregnancy exert a significant influence on infant birth weight and the incidence of macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is associated with an increase in both adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome, and also confers a future risk of childhood obesity. Studies have shown that a low glycaemic diet is associated with lower birth weights, however these studies have been small and not randomised 12. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women, and maternal weight influences this recurrence risk 3.-
dc.description.abstractWe propose a randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet vs. no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of fetal macrosomia. Secundigravid women whose first baby was macrosomic, defined as a birth weight greater than 4000 g will be recruited at their first antenatal visit.Patients will be randomised into two arms, a control arm which will receive no dietary intervention and a diet arm which will be commenced on a low glycaemic index diet.The primary outcome measure will be the mean birth weight centiles and ponderal indices in each group.-
dc.description.abstractAltering the source of maternal dietary carbohydrate may prove to be valuable in the management of pregnancies where there has been a history of fetal macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women. This randomised control trial will investigate whether or not a low glycaemic index diet can affect this recurrence risk.-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMC pregnancy and childbirthen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnthropometry-
dc.subject.meshBirth Weight-
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshDiet, Carbohydrate-Restricted-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFetal Macrosomia-
dc.subject.meshFood Habits-
dc.subject.meshGlycemic Index-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshObesity-
dc.subject.meshParity-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications-
dc.subject.meshRecurrence-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography, Prenatal-
dc.subject.meshWeight Gain-
dc.titleA randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Dublin National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. jennifer.walsh@ucd.ie-
dc.identifier.journalBMC pregnancy and childbirth-
dc.type.qualificationlevelN/Aen
cr.approval.ethicalN/Aen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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