Viral screening at the time of each donation in ART patients: is it justified?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/217170
Title:
Viral screening at the time of each donation in ART patients: is it justified?
Authors:
Hughes, C; Grundy, K; Emerson, G; Mocanu, E
Affiliation:
Human Assisted Reproduction Ireland, Rotunda Hospital, Dublin 1, Dublin. chughes@rcsi.ie
Citation:
Viral screening at the time of each donation in ART patients: is it justified? 2011, 26 (11):3169-72 Hum. Reprod.
Journal:
Human reproduction (Oxford, England)
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/217170
DOI:
10.1093/humrep/der278
PubMed ID:
21865236
Abstract:
The frequency for virology testing for couples undergoing assisted reproductive treatment (ART) in Europe is currently under debate, with little scientific data available to support the time-frame imposed by EU legislation. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of blood-borne viruses (BBV) in this population and to assess the likelihood of seroconversion after an initial negative screen and the possible cost saving to couples.; We identified all cases where a BBV screen was performed on patients attending our tertiary referral unit for ART. We calculated the incidence of Hepatitis B surface antigen, Hepatitis C antibody and HIV infection in this population and the incidence of seroconversion in follow-up screening (which included Hepatitis B core antibody) following the implementation of the EU legislation. In all cases identified, we sought to assess the risk of seroconversion after an initial negative screen.; Between 1998 and 2009, we identified a total of 79 291 tests performed in over 12 500 patients. The incidence in this population of Hepatitis B surface antigen was 0.28% (37/12,797), Hepatitis B core antibody 3.32% (96/2891), Hepatitis C antibody 0.33% (43/12,762) and HIV 0.007% (1/12,819). We were able to show that for over 6500 individuals who were tested and re-tested for all three viruses, no seroconversions were reported.; Based on the above measured negligible risk of seroconversion after an initial negative screen in co-habitating couples participating in an ART programme, current legislation requiring screening of couples at each procurement of cells in the assisted reproductive setting is not clinically justified.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Cryopreservation; European Union; Female; Health Care Costs; Hepatitis B; Hepatitis B Surface Antigens; Hepatitis C; Hepatitis C Antibodies; Humans; Incidence; Male; Mass Screening; Reproductive Techniques, Assisted; Virus Diseases
ISSN:
1460-2350
Ethical Approval:
N/A

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHughes, C-
dc.contributor.authorGrundy, K-
dc.contributor.authorEmerson, G-
dc.contributor.authorMocanu, E-
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-30T11:47:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-30T11:47:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationViral screening at the time of each donation in ART patients: is it justified? 2011, 26 (11):3169-72 Hum. Reprod.-
dc.identifier.issn1460-2350-
dc.identifier.pmid21865236-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/humrep/der278-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/217170-
dc.description.abstractThe frequency for virology testing for couples undergoing assisted reproductive treatment (ART) in Europe is currently under debate, with little scientific data available to support the time-frame imposed by EU legislation. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of blood-borne viruses (BBV) in this population and to assess the likelihood of seroconversion after an initial negative screen and the possible cost saving to couples.-
dc.description.abstractWe identified all cases where a BBV screen was performed on patients attending our tertiary referral unit for ART. We calculated the incidence of Hepatitis B surface antigen, Hepatitis C antibody and HIV infection in this population and the incidence of seroconversion in follow-up screening (which included Hepatitis B core antibody) following the implementation of the EU legislation. In all cases identified, we sought to assess the risk of seroconversion after an initial negative screen.-
dc.description.abstractBetween 1998 and 2009, we identified a total of 79 291 tests performed in over 12 500 patients. The incidence in this population of Hepatitis B surface antigen was 0.28% (37/12,797), Hepatitis B core antibody 3.32% (96/2891), Hepatitis C antibody 0.33% (43/12,762) and HIV 0.007% (1/12,819). We were able to show that for over 6500 individuals who were tested and re-tested for all three viruses, no seroconversions were reported.-
dc.description.abstractBased on the above measured negligible risk of seroconversion after an initial negative screen in co-habitating couples participating in an ART programme, current legislation requiring screening of couples at each procurement of cells in the assisted reproductive setting is not clinically justified.-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Human reproduction (Oxford, England)en_GB
dc.subject.meshCryopreservation-
dc.subject.meshEuropean Union-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Costs-
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B-
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B Surface Antigens-
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C-
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C Antibodies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIncidence-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMass Screening-
dc.subject.meshReproductive Techniques, Assisted-
dc.subject.meshVirus Diseases-
dc.titleViral screening at the time of each donation in ART patients: is it justified?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Assisted Reproduction Ireland, Rotunda Hospital, Dublin 1, Dublin. chughes@rcsi.ie-
dc.identifier.journalHuman reproduction (Oxford, England)-
dc.type.qualificationlevelN/Aen
cr.approval.ethicalN/Aen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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