The farming population in Ireland: mortality trends during the 'Celtic Tiger' years.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/216432
Title:
The farming population in Ireland: mortality trends during the 'Celtic Tiger' years.
Authors:
Smyth, Breda; Evans, David S; Kelly, Alan; Cullen, Louise; O'Donovan, Diarmuid
Affiliation:
1 Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive West, Merlin Park Hospital, Galway, Republic of Ireland.
Citation:
The farming population in Ireland: mortality trends during the 'Celtic Tiger' years. 2012:notEur J Public Health
Journal:
European journal of public health
Issue Date:
21-Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/216432
DOI:
10.1093/eurpub/cks017
PubMed ID:
22436692
Abstract:
Background Although the Irish farming population is a significant occupational group, analysis of their mortality patterns is limited. This study compared mortality trends with other occupational groups and assessed the impact of socio-economic factors. Methods Population and mortality data (2000-06) were obtained to calculate standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) by cause of death and matched with socio-economic data. The extent to which variation in mortality was explained by variations in the socio-economic data was determined using multiple regression. Results Farmers and agricultural workers experienced the highest levels of mortality for all causes of death (2000-06). Farmers are 5.14 times more likely and agricultural workers are 7.35 times more likely to die from any cause of death than the lowest risk group. Circulatory disease is a significant cause of mortality among farmers [SMR = 215.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 201.83-229.98]. Other significant causes include cancers (SMR = 156.60, CI = 146.73-166.48) and injuries and poisonings (SMR = 149.69, CI = 135.44-163.93). Agricultural workers have similar mortality trends: circulatory disease (SMR = 226.27; CI = 192.45-260.08), cancers (SMR = 221.44; CI = 193.88-249.00), and injuries and poisonings (SMR = 353.90; CI = 302.48-405.32). From 2000 to 2006, SMRs increased incrementally. Multiple regression identified farm size and income poverty risk as predictors of mortality. Conclusion Irish farmers and agricultural workers have experienced a reversal of mortality trends compared to the 1980s and 1990s. Policies should target them as a high-risk group.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
HEALTH STATUS
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; HEALTH SERVICE PLANNING
ISSN:
1464-360X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Bredaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEvans, David Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Alanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Louiseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Donovan, Diarmuiden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-23T12:13:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-23T12:13:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-21-
dc.identifier.citationThe farming population in Ireland: mortality trends during the 'Celtic Tiger' years. 2012:notEur J Public Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1464-360X-
dc.identifier.pmid22436692-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/eurpub/cks017-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/216432-
dc.description.abstractBackground Although the Irish farming population is a significant occupational group, analysis of their mortality patterns is limited. This study compared mortality trends with other occupational groups and assessed the impact of socio-economic factors. Methods Population and mortality data (2000-06) were obtained to calculate standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) by cause of death and matched with socio-economic data. The extent to which variation in mortality was explained by variations in the socio-economic data was determined using multiple regression. Results Farmers and agricultural workers experienced the highest levels of mortality for all causes of death (2000-06). Farmers are 5.14 times more likely and agricultural workers are 7.35 times more likely to die from any cause of death than the lowest risk group. Circulatory disease is a significant cause of mortality among farmers [SMR = 215.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 201.83-229.98]. Other significant causes include cancers (SMR = 156.60, CI = 146.73-166.48) and injuries and poisonings (SMR = 149.69, CI = 135.44-163.93). Agricultural workers have similar mortality trends: circulatory disease (SMR = 226.27; CI = 192.45-260.08), cancers (SMR = 221.44; CI = 193.88-249.00), and injuries and poisonings (SMR = 353.90; CI = 302.48-405.32). From 2000 to 2006, SMRs increased incrementally. Multiple regression identified farm size and income poverty risk as predictors of mortality. Conclusion Irish farmers and agricultural workers have experienced a reversal of mortality trends compared to the 1980s and 1990s. Policies should target them as a high-risk group.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of public healthen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH STATUSen
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen
dc.subject.otherHEALTH SERVICE PLANNINGen
dc.titleThe farming population in Ireland: mortality trends during the 'Celtic Tiger' years.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1 Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive West, Merlin Park Hospital, Galway, Republic of Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of public healthen_GB

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