Creating excellence in dementia care: a research review for Ireland’s National Dementia Strategy

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/215312
Title:
Creating excellence in dementia care: a research review for Ireland’s National Dementia Strategy
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH); Cahill, Suzanne; O'Shea, Eamon; Pierce, Maria
Affiliation:
DSIDC’s Living with Dementia Research Programme, School of Social Work and Social Policy, Trinity College, Dublin Irish Centre for Social Gerontology, National University of Ireland, Galway
Publisher:
Deparment of Health (DoH)
Issue Date:
Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/215312
Additional Links:
http://www.doh.ie
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Dementia is a progressive condition that largely affects older people, impacting on their memory, language, ability to communicate, mood and personality. The course of the illness may be gradual and sometimes subtle, as is classically the case in Alzheimer’s disease. While dementia is a medical condition, recent insights from the psychosocial, sociopolitical and public health perspectives have focused attention on the human, social and economic implications of the disease. The ageing of the population across Europe and beyond means that the number of people with dementia will grow in future decades with consequent implications for care provision, care burden and public expenditure. It is no wonder, therefore, that many countries are already preparing for the projected rise in the number of people with dementia by putting in place dedicated action plans and/or dementia strategies. The Irish government has given a commitment in the Programme of Government for 2011-2016 to develop and implement a Strategy for Dementia for Ireland promising to: develop a national Alzheimer’s and other dementias strategy by 2013 to increase awareness, ensure early diagnosis and intervention, and development of enhanced community based services. This strategy will be implemented over five years. The new Strategy has the potential to bring about a major change in public attitudes to dementia in Ireland and to change expectations in regard to the rights of people with dementia. Through the Strategy it should be possible to formulate a plan that emphasises the importance of the person with dementia in decision-making and the role of families and local communities in supporting community-based preferences, wherever possible. It should be possible to develop a plan that will dispel myths, shame and stigma surrounding dementia and enable people to live well with dementia, and promote their autonomy and well-being. It should be possible to develop a Strategy so that people can die in dignity with dementia assured that their complex needs are met by an educated workforce skilled in dementia care and in gerontological nursing and palliative care. The purpose of this report is to create the evidence-based research that will help to lay the foundations for the new Strategy. The objectives of this evidence-based research review, as agreed between the funders (The Atlantic Philanthropies (AP)), the Department of Health and the contract researchers, were fourfold: 1. to review current and future demographic trends in Ireland and provide estimates of current and future dementia prevalence rates, in relation to both those aged 65 and over and younger people; 2. to specify the main economic costs of dementia care; 3. to review current service availability (based on the recent Health Service Executive (HSE) audit) and estimated future demand for services; 4. to review best practice in dementia care locally and internationally. Given the terms of reference, not all issues pertaining to dementia could be covered, but the report does provide the basis for the development of many of the areas that will be central to the new Strategy.
Keywords:
DEMENTIA; OLDER PEOPLE; ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE; AGEING POPULATION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Suzanneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Shea, Eamonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPierce, Mariaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-12T12:22:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-12T12:22:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/215312-
dc.descriptionDementia is a progressive condition that largely affects older people, impacting on their memory, language, ability to communicate, mood and personality. The course of the illness may be gradual and sometimes subtle, as is classically the case in Alzheimer’s disease. While dementia is a medical condition, recent insights from the psychosocial, sociopolitical and public health perspectives have focused attention on the human, social and economic implications of the disease. The ageing of the population across Europe and beyond means that the number of people with dementia will grow in future decades with consequent implications for care provision, care burden and public expenditure. It is no wonder, therefore, that many countries are already preparing for the projected rise in the number of people with dementia by putting in place dedicated action plans and/or dementia strategies. The Irish government has given a commitment in the Programme of Government for 2011-2016 to develop and implement a Strategy for Dementia for Ireland promising to: develop a national Alzheimer’s and other dementias strategy by 2013 to increase awareness, ensure early diagnosis and intervention, and development of enhanced community based services. This strategy will be implemented over five years. The new Strategy has the potential to bring about a major change in public attitudes to dementia in Ireland and to change expectations in regard to the rights of people with dementia. Through the Strategy it should be possible to formulate a plan that emphasises the importance of the person with dementia in decision-making and the role of families and local communities in supporting community-based preferences, wherever possible. It should be possible to develop a plan that will dispel myths, shame and stigma surrounding dementia and enable people to live well with dementia, and promote their autonomy and well-being. It should be possible to develop a Strategy so that people can die in dignity with dementia assured that their complex needs are met by an educated workforce skilled in dementia care and in gerontological nursing and palliative care. The purpose of this report is to create the evidence-based research that will help to lay the foundations for the new Strategy. The objectives of this evidence-based research review, as agreed between the funders (The Atlantic Philanthropies (AP)), the Department of Health and the contract researchers, were fourfold: 1. to review current and future demographic trends in Ireland and provide estimates of current and future dementia prevalence rates, in relation to both those aged 65 and over and younger people; 2. to specify the main economic costs of dementia care; 3. to review current service availability (based on the recent Health Service Executive (HSE) audit) and estimated future demand for services; 4. to review best practice in dementia care locally and internationally. Given the terms of reference, not all issues pertaining to dementia could be covered, but the report does provide the basis for the development of many of the areas that will be central to the new Strategy.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDeparment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.doh.ieen_GB
dc.subjectDEMENTIAen_GB
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectALZHEIMER'S DISEASEen_GB
dc.subjectAGEING POPULATIONen_GB
dc.titleCreating excellence in dementia care: a research review for Ireland’s National Dementia Strategyen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentDSIDC’s Living with Dementia Research Programme, School of Social Work and Social Policy, Trinity College, Dublin Irish Centre for Social Gerontology, National University of Ireland, Galwayen_GB
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