Trends in COPD mortality and in-patient admissions in men & women: evidence of convergence.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/213671
Title:
Trends in COPD mortality and in-patient admissions in men & women: evidence of convergence.
Authors:
O'Farrell, A; De La Harpe, D; Johnson, H; Bennett, K
Affiliation:
Health Intelligence Unit, Health Service Executive, Palmerstown, Dublin 20. ann.ofarrell@hse.ie
Citation:
Trends in COPD mortality and in-patient admissions in men & women: evidence of convergence. 2011, 104 (8):245-8 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Sep-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/213671
PubMed ID:
22125880
Abstract:
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although more prevalent in men, it is anticipated that, due to the convergence in smoking rates, the prevalence rate in women will surpass that of men. There were 14,519 deaths attributable to COPD in the period 2000-2009. Although deaths decreased for both sexes, reduction in deaths was significantly higher among men (test for trend, p<0.01 for men vs. p=0.06 for women). Smoking rates decreased for both sexes from 1980-2009 with the percentage reduction in smoking significantly greater in men (11.5% vs. 7.0%, p<0.001). There has been a convergence in COPD deaths and COPD hospital in-patient discharges for men and women that mirrors the trend in the convergence of male and female smoking rates. This study provides evidence of the need for effective smoking cessation programmes that are targeted at women as well as men.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; HEALTH SERVICE PLANNING
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Chi-Square Distribution; Female; Humans; Ireland; Length of Stay; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality; Patient Admission; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Smoking; Smoking Cessation
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Farrell, Aen
dc.contributor.authorDe La Harpe, Den
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Hen
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-01T09:29:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-01T09:29:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-09-
dc.identifier.citationTrends in COPD mortality and in-patient admissions in men & women: evidence of convergence. 2011, 104 (8):245-8 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid22125880-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/213671-
dc.description.abstractChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although more prevalent in men, it is anticipated that, due to the convergence in smoking rates, the prevalence rate in women will surpass that of men. There were 14,519 deaths attributable to COPD in the period 2000-2009. Although deaths decreased for both sexes, reduction in deaths was significantly higher among men (test for trend, p<0.01 for men vs. p=0.06 for women). Smoking rates decreased for both sexes from 1980-2009 with the percentage reduction in smoking significantly greater in men (11.5% vs. 7.0%, p<0.001). There has been a convergence in COPD deaths and COPD hospital in-patient discharges for men and women that mirrors the trend in the convergence of male and female smoking rates. This study provides evidence of the need for effective smoking cessation programmes that are targeted at women as well as men.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshMortality-
dc.subject.meshPatient Admission-
dc.subject.meshPrevalence-
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.subject.meshSmoking-
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessation-
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT-
dc.subject.otherHEALTH SERVICE PLANNING-
dc.titleTrends in COPD mortality and in-patient admissions in men & women: evidence of convergence.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Intelligence Unit, Health Service Executive, Palmerstown, Dublin 20. ann.ofarrell@hse.ieen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen

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