Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/213510
Title:
Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?
Authors:
Emmanuel, A; Byrne, J; Wilson, I; Balfe, P
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, St Luke's Hospital, Freshford Road, Kilkenny. arhemmanuel@gmail.com
Citation:
Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting? 2011, 104 (9):276-8 Ir Med J
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Oct-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/213510
PubMed ID:
22132597
Abstract:
Laparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Appendectomy; Female; General Surgery; Humans; Internship and Residency; Ireland; Laparoscopy; Length of Stay; Male; Postoperative Complications; Retrospective Studies
ISSN:
0332-3102
Ethical Approval:
N/A

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEmmanuel, A-
dc.contributor.authorByrne, J-
dc.contributor.authorWilson, I-
dc.contributor.authorBalfe, P-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T10:49:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-29T10:49:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-
dc.identifier.citationIs laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting? 2011, 104 (9):276-8 Ir Med J-
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid22132597-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/213510-
dc.description.abstractLaparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAppendectomy-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGeneral Surgery-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInternship and Residency-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.titleIs laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, St Luke's Hospital, Freshford Road, Kilkenny. arhemmanuel@gmail.com-
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journal-
dc.type.qualificationlevelN/Aen
cr.approval.ethicalN/Aen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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