Population Health Information Tool (PHIT)

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/213010
Title:
Population Health Information Tool (PHIT)
Authors:
Health Service Executive (HSE), Offi ce of the Nursing & Midwifery Services Director
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
Jan-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/213010
Additional Links:
http://www.hse.ie
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The transformation of the health and social care services aims to improve outcomes for patients. The public health nursing service has a key role to play in this process by providing quality care in the community setting. Quality in health care is underpinned by good governance which incorporates information systems and processes that promote safe and eff ective care and which includes the patient’s perspective. Equity is an important aspect of quality and is supported by ensuring the right service for the right patient in the right setting. The role of the Public Health Nurse (PHN) has expanded in recent years to include signifi cant numbers of patients requiring clinical interventions following discharge from acute hospital services or who have been referred directly within primary care/ community setting. Continuing complex care needs are also consuming nursing time in the community. The information systems used to collect data for performance monitoring and to guide and predict workforce planning, are not aligned to the current PHN role. A group of nurses in Local Health Offi ce (LHO) at Dublin North Central (DNC) explored the health information systems available to them and identifi ed a gap in the traditional information pathway which impeded the inclusion of the individual patient from their respective population subgroup, thereby reducing the potential for an equitable service. They investigated ways of bridging this gap and found that a comprehensive system of patient registration was the solution. The evidence-based population health information tool (PHIT) which they subsequently developed now eff ectively guides their nursing case and caseload work in the community. The new PHIT paper based system is introduced to nurses in induction sessions in LHO, DNC is included in ongoing training sessions and is delivered to post graduate students in the local third-level education institute. Managers working with this new system sit on local Health Service Executive (HSE) community nursing interview boards and have increased awareness of the skill mix necessary to respond to health needs in their areas. The tool that has been developed can identify groups needing care and can show demographic and epidemiological trends over time. Older people account for 12.6% of the population in DNC (they comprise11% of the population nationally). The HSE’s (2008) Corporate Plan 2008-2011 advises that the number of those over 65 years of age will have increased to 16% by 2011 and to 40% by 2016 nationally. PHIT has already identifi ed such changes in target group composition: e.g. the overall number of older adults registered by nurses into PHIT between 2007 and 2009 increased by 1% but the proportion of those over 85 years increased by 20% in this time. Health information such as this is critical for workforce planning purposes (DOHC & HSE 2009). In the course of developing the tool it was necessary to create a system that could rank patients according to their level of dependency or their need for nursing care to support equitable caseload allocation. A future development will see this dependency scoring system used by the multidisciplinary primary care team. The identifi cation of ‘inactive’ cases has been another factor which has helped streamline caseloads and direct nursing care appropriately.
Keywords:
NURSE; NURSING; MIDWIFE; MIDWIFERY; PUBLIC HEALTH
ISBN:
987-1-906218-40-9

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE), Offi ce of the Nursing & Midwifery Services Directoren
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-27T14:33:34Zen
dc.date.available2012-02-27T14:33:34Zen
dc.date.issued2011-01en
dc.identifier.isbn987-1-906218-40-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/213010en
dc.descriptionThe transformation of the health and social care services aims to improve outcomes for patients. The public health nursing service has a key role to play in this process by providing quality care in the community setting. Quality in health care is underpinned by good governance which incorporates information systems and processes that promote safe and eff ective care and which includes the patient’s perspective. Equity is an important aspect of quality and is supported by ensuring the right service for the right patient in the right setting. The role of the Public Health Nurse (PHN) has expanded in recent years to include signifi cant numbers of patients requiring clinical interventions following discharge from acute hospital services or who have been referred directly within primary care/ community setting. Continuing complex care needs are also consuming nursing time in the community. The information systems used to collect data for performance monitoring and to guide and predict workforce planning, are not aligned to the current PHN role. A group of nurses in Local Health Offi ce (LHO) at Dublin North Central (DNC) explored the health information systems available to them and identifi ed a gap in the traditional information pathway which impeded the inclusion of the individual patient from their respective population subgroup, thereby reducing the potential for an equitable service. They investigated ways of bridging this gap and found that a comprehensive system of patient registration was the solution. The evidence-based population health information tool (PHIT) which they subsequently developed now eff ectively guides their nursing case and caseload work in the community. The new PHIT paper based system is introduced to nurses in induction sessions in LHO, DNC is included in ongoing training sessions and is delivered to post graduate students in the local third-level education institute. Managers working with this new system sit on local Health Service Executive (HSE) community nursing interview boards and have increased awareness of the skill mix necessary to respond to health needs in their areas. The tool that has been developed can identify groups needing care and can show demographic and epidemiological trends over time. Older people account for 12.6% of the population in DNC (they comprise11% of the population nationally). The HSE’s (2008) Corporate Plan 2008-2011 advises that the number of those over 65 years of age will have increased to 16% by 2011 and to 40% by 2016 nationally. PHIT has already identifi ed such changes in target group composition: e.g. the overall number of older adults registered by nurses into PHIT between 2007 and 2009 increased by 1% but the proportion of those over 85 years increased by 20% in this time. Health information such as this is critical for workforce planning purposes (DOHC & HSE 2009). In the course of developing the tool it was necessary to create a system that could rank patients according to their level of dependency or their need for nursing care to support equitable caseload allocation. A future development will see this dependency scoring system used by the multidisciplinary primary care team. The identifi cation of ‘inactive’ cases has been another factor which has helped streamline caseloads and direct nursing care appropriately.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hse.ieen
dc.subjectNURSEen
dc.subjectNURSINGen
dc.subjectMIDWIFEen
dc.subjectMIDWIFERYen
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen
dc.titlePopulation Health Information Tool (PHIT)en
dc.typeReporten
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