An economic perspective of dementia care in Ireland:maximising benefits and maintaining cost efficiency

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/212729
Title:
An economic perspective of dementia care in Ireland:maximising benefits and maintaining cost efficiency
Authors:
Trepel, Dominic
Affiliation:
University of Limerick (UL)
Publisher:
Care Alliance Ireland
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/212729
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Dementia is a major health issue and a global condition. Increasing prevalence, costs and burden of disease assert significant pressure on economic and social systems in many countries. Globally costs for people with dementia amount to more than 1% of gross domestic product (GDP)[1]. Concurrently, the World Health Organisation [2]observes a growing gap between budget allocation and the associated burden of mental health disorders, particularly in higher income countries. Point in care, the economic burden of dementia ranks higher than stroke, heart disease and cancer combined [3], however health care allocations for dementia continue to be substantially lower than each of these individual disease groups. Given the multiple agents who are involved in dementia care, ascertaining expenditure has inherent difficulties. A common indicator is investment on long term care, which is the composite of institutional and community based home care. Figure 1 compares spend (as a percentage of GDP) on long term care for both public and private sectors[4]. In terms of percentage of GDP, Ireland spends approximately half the OECD average. More importantly, UK, Canada and Australia where dementia specific strategies have been implemented shows show sizable differences. Ireland is predicted to have the largest growth in the older population of all European countries in the coming decades[5]. In real terms, the population is predicted to increase threefold and with this so will the demand for dementia specific services. Given the prognosis of dementia combined with predicted economic impacts, the WHO indicate that the key priority for dementia is targeted interventions towards the carer.
Keywords:
CARERS; DEMENTIA; ECONOMIC EVALUATION; HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT
Sponsors:
This report gratefully acknowledges funding from the Irish Research Council for Humanities and Social Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTrepel, Dominicen
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-24T15:14:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-24T15:14:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/212729-
dc.descriptionDementia is a major health issue and a global condition. Increasing prevalence, costs and burden of disease assert significant pressure on economic and social systems in many countries. Globally costs for people with dementia amount to more than 1% of gross domestic product (GDP)[1]. Concurrently, the World Health Organisation [2]observes a growing gap between budget allocation and the associated burden of mental health disorders, particularly in higher income countries. Point in care, the economic burden of dementia ranks higher than stroke, heart disease and cancer combined [3], however health care allocations for dementia continue to be substantially lower than each of these individual disease groups. Given the multiple agents who are involved in dementia care, ascertaining expenditure has inherent difficulties. A common indicator is investment on long term care, which is the composite of institutional and community based home care. Figure 1 compares spend (as a percentage of GDP) on long term care for both public and private sectors[4]. In terms of percentage of GDP, Ireland spends approximately half the OECD average. More importantly, UK, Canada and Australia where dementia specific strategies have been implemented shows show sizable differences. Ireland is predicted to have the largest growth in the older population of all European countries in the coming decades[5]. In real terms, the population is predicted to increase threefold and with this so will the demand for dementia specific services. Given the prognosis of dementia combined with predicted economic impacts, the WHO indicate that the key priority for dementia is targeted interventions towards the carer.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis report gratefully acknowledges funding from the Irish Research Council for Humanities and Social Sciencesen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCare Alliance Irelanden
dc.subjectCARERSen
dc.subjectDEMENTIAen
dc.subjectECONOMIC EVALUATIONen
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENTen
dc.titleAn economic perspective of dementia care in Ireland:maximising benefits and maintaining cost efficiencyen
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Limerick (UL)en
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