An evaluation of uptake and experience of a pilot interpreting service

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/212690
Title:
An evaluation of uptake and experience of a pilot interpreting service
Authors:
Health Service Executive (HSE); MacFarlane, Anne Dr.; O’Reilly-de Brún, Mary
Affiliation:
Department of General Practice, NUI Galway; Centre for Participatory Strategies, Clonbur, Co. Galway
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/212690
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
In September 2005, the Health Service Executive initiated a free pilot interpreting service in the former HSE Eastern Region. The functional area of this health authority was the county borough of Dublin and the administrative counties South Dublin, Fingal, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Kildare and Wicklow (see Map page 20). The service, provided by a commercial interpreting company, was available to all general practitioners in the area. It is important to emphasise that the impetus for the project came from the general practice community. General practitioners had reported that language barriers were a major problem for them in their work with service users with limited English and they called for resources for interpreting services (Crowley, 2003). In response, the Department of Health and Children provided funding for a pilot interpreting service for general practitioners. For the Health Service Executive, the development of the pilot interpreting service linked positively with the recommendations of the Eastern Regional Health Authority Strategy for Ethnic Minority Service Users (2004). The HSE Social Inclusion Unit and Primary, Community and Continuing Care (PCCC) directorate, in collaboration with the Irish College of General Practitioners, undertook extensive preparations for the development and initiation of the service (see Chapter 1 page 17-21 for full details of the impetus and development of the pilot interpreting service). However, an initial assessment of use after six months showed that uptake of the service by general practitioners was very low. Therefore, the Health Service Executive, as part of its implementation priorities for the National Intercultural Health Strategy, commissioned this combined methods evaluation of the pilot interpreting service to explore the ‘gap’ between the demand from general practitioners for an interpreting service and the evidence of their low uptake of that service when made available free of charge. In terms of exploring this phenomenon, current perspectives in the international literature suggest that it is valuable to adopt an organisational perspective to understand why service provision does not guarantee service uptake. More specifically, we need to explore levers and barriers to uptake and the wider context in which these occur (see Chapter 2 pages 22-23 for further details of the rationale for an organisational perspective for this issue). These facts and perspectives inform the present study in terms of focus, identification of key aims and objectives, research context, approach, and methodology.
Keywords:
PUBLIC HEALTH; GENERAL PRACTICE; LANGUAGE; COMMUNICATION AND KNOWLEDGE
Local subject classification:
INTERPRETOR
Sponsors:
For HSE Social Inclusion Office

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.contributor.authorMacFarlane, Anne Dr.en
dc.contributor.authorO’Reilly-de Brún, Maryen
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-24T11:44:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-24T11:44:05Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/212690-
dc.descriptionIn September 2005, the Health Service Executive initiated a free pilot interpreting service in the former HSE Eastern Region. The functional area of this health authority was the county borough of Dublin and the administrative counties South Dublin, Fingal, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Kildare and Wicklow (see Map page 20). The service, provided by a commercial interpreting company, was available to all general practitioners in the area. It is important to emphasise that the impetus for the project came from the general practice community. General practitioners had reported that language barriers were a major problem for them in their work with service users with limited English and they called for resources for interpreting services (Crowley, 2003). In response, the Department of Health and Children provided funding for a pilot interpreting service for general practitioners. For the Health Service Executive, the development of the pilot interpreting service linked positively with the recommendations of the Eastern Regional Health Authority Strategy for Ethnic Minority Service Users (2004). The HSE Social Inclusion Unit and Primary, Community and Continuing Care (PCCC) directorate, in collaboration with the Irish College of General Practitioners, undertook extensive preparations for the development and initiation of the service (see Chapter 1 page 17-21 for full details of the impetus and development of the pilot interpreting service). However, an initial assessment of use after six months showed that uptake of the service by general practitioners was very low. Therefore, the Health Service Executive, as part of its implementation priorities for the National Intercultural Health Strategy, commissioned this combined methods evaluation of the pilot interpreting service to explore the ‘gap’ between the demand from general practitioners for an interpreting service and the evidence of their low uptake of that service when made available free of charge. In terms of exploring this phenomenon, current perspectives in the international literature suggest that it is valuable to adopt an organisational perspective to understand why service provision does not guarantee service uptake. More specifically, we need to explore levers and barriers to uptake and the wider context in which these occur (see Chapter 2 pages 22-23 for further details of the rationale for an organisational perspective for this issue). These facts and perspectives inform the present study in terms of focus, identification of key aims and objectives, research context, approach, and methodology.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFor HSE Social Inclusion Officeen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen
dc.subjectGENERAL PRACTICEen
dc.subjectLANGUAGEen
dc.subjectCOMMUNICATION AND KNOWLEDGEen
dc.subject.otherINTERPRETORen
dc.titleAn evaluation of uptake and experience of a pilot interpreting serviceen
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of General Practice, NUI Galway; Centre for Participatory Strategies, Clonbur, Co. Galwayen
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