Suppression of Cancer Stemness p21-regulating mRNA and microRNA Signatures in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer Patient Samples

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/212650
Title:
Suppression of Cancer Stemness p21-regulating mRNA and microRNA Signatures in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer Patient Samples
Authors:
Gallagher, Michael F; Heffron, Cynthia CBB; Laios, Alexandros; O'Toole, Sharon A; Ffrench, Brendan; Smyth, Paul C; Flavin, Richard J; Elbaruni, Salah A; Spillane, Cathy D; Martin, Cara M; Shelis, Orla M; O'Leary, John J
Citation:
Journal of Ovarian Research. 2012 Jan 19;5(1):2
Issue Date:
19-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/212650
Abstract:
Abstract Background Malignant ovarian disease is characterised by high rates of mortality due to high rates of recurrent chemoresistant disease. Anecdotal evidence indicates this may be due to chemoresistant properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, our understanding of the role of CSCs in recurrent ovarian disease remains sparse. In this study we used gene microarrays and meta-analysis of our previously published microRNA (miRNA) data to assess the involvement of cancer stemness signatures in recurrent ovarian disease. Methods Microarray analysis was used to characterise early regulation events in an embryonal carcinoma (EC) model of cancer stemness. This was then compared to our previously published microarray data from a study of primary versus recurrent ovarian disease. In parallel, meta-analysis was used to identify cancer stemness miRNA signatures in tumor patient samples. Results Microarray analysis demonstrated a 90% difference between gene expression events involved in early regulation of differentiation in murine EC (mEC) and embryonic stem (mES) cells. This contrasts the known parallels between mEC and mES cells in the undifferentiated and well-differentiated states. Genelist comparisons identified a cancer stemness signature set of genes in primary versus recurrent data, a subset of which are known p53-p21 regulators. This signature is present in primary and recurrent or in primary alone but essentially never in recurrent tumors specifically. Meta-analysis of miRNA expression showed a much stronger cancer stemness signature within tumor samples. This miRNA signature again related to p53-p21 regulation and was expressed prominently in recurrent tumors. Our data indicate that the regulation of p53-p21 in ovarian cancer involves, at least partially, a cancer stemness component. Conclusion We present a p53-p21 cancer stemness signature model for ovarian cancer. We propose that this may, at least partially, differentially regulate the p53-p21 mechanism in ovarian disease. Targeting CSCs within ovarian cancer represents a potential therapeutic avenue.
Item Type:
Journal Article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Michael F-
dc.contributor.authorHeffron, Cynthia CBB-
dc.contributor.authorLaios, Alexandros-
dc.contributor.authorO'Toole, Sharon A-
dc.contributor.authorFfrench, Brendan-
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Paul C-
dc.contributor.authorFlavin, Richard J-
dc.contributor.authorElbaruni, Salah A-
dc.contributor.authorSpillane, Cathy D-
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Cara M-
dc.contributor.authorShelis, Orla M-
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, John J-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-24T09:42:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-24T09:42:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-19-
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1757-2215-5-2-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Ovarian Research. 2012 Jan 19;5(1):2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/212650-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Malignant ovarian disease is characterised by high rates of mortality due to high rates of recurrent chemoresistant disease. Anecdotal evidence indicates this may be due to chemoresistant properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, our understanding of the role of CSCs in recurrent ovarian disease remains sparse. In this study we used gene microarrays and meta-analysis of our previously published microRNA (miRNA) data to assess the involvement of cancer stemness signatures in recurrent ovarian disease. Methods Microarray analysis was used to characterise early regulation events in an embryonal carcinoma (EC) model of cancer stemness. This was then compared to our previously published microarray data from a study of primary versus recurrent ovarian disease. In parallel, meta-analysis was used to identify cancer stemness miRNA signatures in tumor patient samples. Results Microarray analysis demonstrated a 90% difference between gene expression events involved in early regulation of differentiation in murine EC (mEC) and embryonic stem (mES) cells. This contrasts the known parallels between mEC and mES cells in the undifferentiated and well-differentiated states. Genelist comparisons identified a cancer stemness signature set of genes in primary versus recurrent data, a subset of which are known p53-p21 regulators. This signature is present in primary and recurrent or in primary alone but essentially never in recurrent tumors specifically. Meta-analysis of miRNA expression showed a much stronger cancer stemness signature within tumor samples. This miRNA signature again related to p53-p21 regulation and was expressed prominently in recurrent tumors. Our data indicate that the regulation of p53-p21 in ovarian cancer involves, at least partially, a cancer stemness component. Conclusion We present a p53-p21 cancer stemness signature model for ovarian cancer. We propose that this may, at least partially, differentially regulate the p53-p21 mechanism in ovarian disease. Targeting CSCs within ovarian cancer represents a potential therapeutic avenue.-
dc.titleSuppression of Cancer Stemness p21-regulating mRNA and microRNA Signatures in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer Patient Samples-
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderGallagher et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2012-02-22T16:08:46Z-
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