Treatment of sepsis: current status of clinical immunotherapy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209293
Title:
Treatment of sepsis: current status of clinical immunotherapy.
Authors:
O'Callaghan, A; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland., ocallaghan@excite.com
Citation:
Surgeon. 2006 Dec;4(6):355-61.
Journal:
The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209293
PubMed ID:
17152200
Abstract:
While antibiotics address the root cause of sepsis--that of pathogen infection--they fail to provide an adequate cure for the condition. Currently, 30% to 50% of septic patients die, and this figure is likely to increase in line with the proliferation of multi-drug resistant bacteria. With an increased understanding of the immune response, it has been proposed that modulation of this defence mechanism offers the best hope of cure. Many entry-points in the immune system have been identified and targeted therapies have been developed,but why are these not in routine clinical practice? This review examines the latest evidence for the use of immuno-modulating drugs, obtained from human clinical trials. We discuss cytokine-based therapies, steroids and anti-coagulants. Finally, consideration is given as to why successful therapies in the laboratory, and in vivo models, do not automatically translate into clinical benefit
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Anticoagulants/therapeutic use; Clinical Trials as Topic; Cytokines/therapeutic use; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/drug effects/immunology; Humans; *Immunotherapy/methods; Sepsis/immunology/physiopathology/*therapy; Steroids/therapeutic use
ISSN:
1479-666X (Print); 1479-666X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:17:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:17:25Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:17:25Z-
dc.identifier.citationSurgeon. 2006 Dec;4(6):355-61.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid17152200en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209293-
dc.description.abstractWhile antibiotics address the root cause of sepsis--that of pathogen infection--they fail to provide an adequate cure for the condition. Currently, 30% to 50% of septic patients die, and this figure is likely to increase in line with the proliferation of multi-drug resistant bacteria. With an increased understanding of the immune response, it has been proposed that modulation of this defence mechanism offers the best hope of cure. Many entry-points in the immune system have been identified and targeted therapies have been developed,but why are these not in routine clinical practice? This review examines the latest evidence for the use of immuno-modulating drugs, obtained from human clinical trials. We discuss cytokine-based therapies, steroids and anti-coagulants. Finally, consideration is given as to why successful therapies in the laboratory, and in vivo models, do not automatically translate into clinical benefiten_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnticoagulants/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials as Topicen_GB
dc.subject.meshCytokines/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/drug effects/immunologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Immunotherapy/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSepsis/immunology/physiopathology/*therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSteroids/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.titleTreatment of sepsis: current status of clinical immunotherapy.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland., ocallaghan@excite.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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