Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209259
Title:
Endoscopy in pregnancy.
Authors:
O'mahony, Seamus
Affiliation:
Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. seamus.omahony@mailp.hse.ie
Citation:
Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2007;21(5):893-9.
Journal:
Best practice & research. Clinical gastroenterology
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209259
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpg.2007.05.007
PubMed ID:
17889814
Abstract:
Endoscopy is rarely required during pregnancy. The potential risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include foetal hypoxia due to sedative drugs and exposure to radiation. There is no evidence that endoscopy precipitates premature labour, and studies in this area have concluded that endoscopy during pregnancy is generally safe. There should be a strong indication for the procedure, which should be deferred whenever possible to the second trimester. Procedures should be performed without any sedation, or with the lowest dose of sedative medication. Radiation exposure should be kept to a minimum. Support should be obtained from specialists in obstetrics and anaesthesia. Indications for endoscopy during pregnancy are as follows: (1) gastroscopy: upper gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia, uncontrolled nausea/vomiting; (2) sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy: rectal bleeding, diarrhoea; and (3) ERCP: choledocholithiasis, biliary pancreatitis. Sedative drugs, such as midazolam appear to be safe if used carefully. Radiation exposure during ERCP can be kept well below the danger level for teratogenicity.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Endoscopy, Digestive System/*methods; Female; Gastrointestinal Diseases/*diagnosis/drug therapy; Humans; Hypnotics and Sedatives/therapeutic use; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications/*diagnosis/drug therapy
ISSN:
1521-6918 (Print); 1521-6918 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'mahony, Seamusen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:16:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:16:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:16:28Z-
dc.identifier.citationBest Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2007;21(5):893-9.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1521-6918 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1521-6918 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid17889814en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpg.2007.05.007en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209259-
dc.description.abstractEndoscopy is rarely required during pregnancy. The potential risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include foetal hypoxia due to sedative drugs and exposure to radiation. There is no evidence that endoscopy precipitates premature labour, and studies in this area have concluded that endoscopy during pregnancy is generally safe. There should be a strong indication for the procedure, which should be deferred whenever possible to the second trimester. Procedures should be performed without any sedation, or with the lowest dose of sedative medication. Radiation exposure should be kept to a minimum. Support should be obtained from specialists in obstetrics and anaesthesia. Indications for endoscopy during pregnancy are as follows: (1) gastroscopy: upper gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia, uncontrolled nausea/vomiting; (2) sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy: rectal bleeding, diarrhoea; and (3) ERCP: choledocholithiasis, biliary pancreatitis. Sedative drugs, such as midazolam appear to be safe if used carefully. Radiation exposure during ERCP can be kept well below the danger level for teratogenicity.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshEndoscopy, Digestive System/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Diseases/*diagnosis/drug therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHypnotics and Sedatives/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications/*diagnosis/drug therapyen_GB
dc.titleEndoscopy in pregnancy.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. seamus.omahony@mailp.hse.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalBest practice & research. Clinical gastroenterologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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