Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209256
Title:
Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.
Authors:
O'Donnell, Brian D; Iohom, Gabriella
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Cork University Hospital, , Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2008 Dec;21(6):723-8.
Journal:
Current opinion in anaesthesiology
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209256
PubMed ID:
19009687
Abstract:
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
*Ambulatory Surgical Procedures; Analgesia, Patient-Controlled/*methods; Anesthesia, Spinal/*methods; Anesthetics, Local/administration & dosage; Catheterization; Extremities/innervation; Humans; Nerve Block/instrumentation/*methods; *Orthopedic Procedures
ISSN:
1473-6500 (Electronic); 0952-7907 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Brian Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorIohom, Gabriellaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:16:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:16:23Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:16:23Z-
dc.identifier.citationCurr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2008 Dec;21(6):723-8.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1473-6500 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0952-7907 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19009687en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209256-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Ambulatory Surgical Proceduresen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnalgesia, Patient-Controlled/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, Spinal/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics, Local/administration & dosageen_GB
dc.subject.meshCatheterizationen_GB
dc.subject.meshExtremities/innervationen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshNerve Block/instrumentation/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Orthopedic Proceduresen_GB
dc.titleRegional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Cork University Hospital, , Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalCurrent opinion in anaesthesiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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