Bacteria: a new player in gastrointestinal motility disorders--infections, bacterial overgrowth, and probiotics.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209255
Title:
Bacteria: a new player in gastrointestinal motility disorders--infections, bacterial overgrowth, and probiotics.
Authors:
Quigley, Eamonn M M
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, , Clinical Sciences Building, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland., e.quigley@ucc.ie
Citation:
Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 2007 Sep;36(3):735-48, xi.
Journal:
Gastroenterology clinics of North America
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209255
DOI:
10.1016/j.gtc.2007.07.012
PubMed ID:
17950446
Abstract:
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may result from a dysfunctional interaction between the indigenous flora and the intestinal mucosa, which in turn leads to immune activation in the colonic mucosa. Some propose that bacterial overgrowth is a common causative factor in the pathogenesis of symptoms in IBS; others point to evidence suggesting that the cause stems from more subtle qualitative changes in the colonic flora. Bacterial overgrowth will probably prove not to be a major factor in what will eventually be defined as IBS. Nevertheless, short-term therapy with either antibiotics or probiotics seems to reduce symptoms among IBS patients. However, in the long term, safety issues will favor the probiotic approach; results of long-term studies with these agents are eagerly awaited.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Bacteria/*growth & development; *Bacterial Infections/complications/drug therapy/microbiology; *Gastrointestinal Diseases/drug therapy/etiology/microbiology; Gastrointestinal Tract/*microbiology; Humans; Probiotics/*therapeutic use
ISSN:
0889-8553 (Print); 0889-8553 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, Eamonn M Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:16:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:16:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:16:22Z-
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterol Clin North Am. 2007 Sep;36(3):735-48, xi.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0889-8553 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0889-8553 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid17950446en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gtc.2007.07.012en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209255-
dc.description.abstractIrritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may result from a dysfunctional interaction between the indigenous flora and the intestinal mucosa, which in turn leads to immune activation in the colonic mucosa. Some propose that bacterial overgrowth is a common causative factor in the pathogenesis of symptoms in IBS; others point to evidence suggesting that the cause stems from more subtle qualitative changes in the colonic flora. Bacterial overgrowth will probably prove not to be a major factor in what will eventually be defined as IBS. Nevertheless, short-term therapy with either antibiotics or probiotics seems to reduce symptoms among IBS patients. However, in the long term, safety issues will favor the probiotic approach; results of long-term studies with these agents are eagerly awaited.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshBacteria/*growth & developmenten_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Bacterial Infections/complications/drug therapy/microbiologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Gastrointestinal Diseases/drug therapy/etiology/microbiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Tract/*microbiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshProbiotics/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.titleBacteria: a new player in gastrointestinal motility disorders--infections, bacterial overgrowth, and probiotics.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, , Clinical Sciences Building, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland., e.quigley@ucc.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalGastroenterology clinics of North Americaen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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