Recent trends in chlamydial and gonococcal conjunctivitis among neonates and adults in an Irish hospital.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209248
Title:
Recent trends in chlamydial and gonococcal conjunctivitis among neonates and adults in an Irish hospital.
Authors:
Quirke, Michael; Cullinane, Anthony
Affiliation:
Department of Ophthalmology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland., mmmquirke@hotmail.com
Citation:
Int J Infect Dis. 2008 Jul;12(4):371-3. Epub 2008 Feb 21.
Journal:
International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the, International Society for Infectious Diseases
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209248
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2007.09.013
PubMed ID:
18093859
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are two important and frequently overlooked causes of neonatal and adult conjunctivitis. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: In order to improve primary treatment, prevention, and control of infection caused by these organisms, an analysis of all cases presenting from July 2002 to December 2006 at a major Irish regional teaching hospital was performed. RESULTS: There were 51 cases of conjunctivitis in total. Among neonates and adults, C. trachomatis was the most common cause of conjunctivitis. Of the adult patients, 75% were men. The annual incidence of adult chlamydial conjunctivitis increased yearly from 2002 and correlated with an overall increase in genital chlamydia infection in the region. Neonatal chlamydial conjunctivitis has an overall incidence of 0.65/1000 live births and is continuing to rise annually. In 2006, gonococcal conjunctivitis accounted for 20% of all cases of conjunctivitis caused by sexually transmitted bacteria presenting to our hospital. CONCLUSIONS: The recent increase in the incidence of gonococcal keratitis serves to remind us that this important infection should be borne in mind when treating cases of purulent conjunctivitis. The diagnosis of chlamydial and gonococcal conjunctivitis requires a high index of suspicion and prompt treatment with systemic antibiotics.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Female; Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data; Humans; Incidence; Infant, Newborn; Ireland/epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Ophthalmia Neonatorum/*epidemiology; Trachoma/*epidemiology
ISSN:
1201-9712 (Print); 1201-9712 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuirke, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCullinane, Anthonyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:16:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:16:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:16:10Z-
dc.identifier.citationInt J Infect Dis. 2008 Jul;12(4):371-3. Epub 2008 Feb 21.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1201-9712 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1201-9712 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18093859en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijid.2007.09.013en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209248-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are two important and frequently overlooked causes of neonatal and adult conjunctivitis. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: In order to improve primary treatment, prevention, and control of infection caused by these organisms, an analysis of all cases presenting from July 2002 to December 2006 at a major Irish regional teaching hospital was performed. RESULTS: There were 51 cases of conjunctivitis in total. Among neonates and adults, C. trachomatis was the most common cause of conjunctivitis. Of the adult patients, 75% were men. The annual incidence of adult chlamydial conjunctivitis increased yearly from 2002 and correlated with an overall increase in genital chlamydia infection in the region. Neonatal chlamydial conjunctivitis has an overall incidence of 0.65/1000 live births and is continuing to rise annually. In 2006, gonococcal conjunctivitis accounted for 20% of all cases of conjunctivitis caused by sexually transmitted bacteria presenting to our hospital. CONCLUSIONS: The recent increase in the incidence of gonococcal keratitis serves to remind us that this important infection should be borne in mind when treating cases of purulent conjunctivitis. The diagnosis of chlamydial and gonococcal conjunctivitis requires a high index of suspicion and prompt treatment with systemic antibiotics.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitals, University/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshOphthalmia Neonatorum/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTrachoma/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.titleRecent trends in chlamydial and gonococcal conjunctivitis among neonates and adults in an Irish hospital.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ophthalmology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland., mmmquirke@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the, International Society for Infectious Diseasesen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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